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Spring Semester 2019 Undergraduate Courses

Course                      

Instructor     

Course Description

ENGL/HIST/ANTHR 2210
Introduction to Folklore


Online 

 Heidi Williams Introduction to major genres of folklore: fairy-tales, urban legends, creation myths, jokes, calendar customs, material culture, religious folklore, occupational folklore, children’s folklore, and digital folklore. The final project consists of basic folklore research methods: interviewing and collecting. Cross-listed as: ANTH 2210, ENGL 2210, and HIST 2210. 

ENGL 2600
Literary Analysis

MWF 10:30 – 11:20 

 

Dr. Paul Crumbley

This is a required course for all English majors. The class introduces approaches to literary analysis that emphasize close reading and provide strategies for writing about fiction, poetry, and drama. Course texts include an introduction to literary analysis that examines all three genres, plus F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, August Wilson’s Fences, and May Swenson’s Nature: Poems Old and New. Students will complete close readings of literary texts, discuss the aims of analytic argument, review key organizational principles, learn how to incorporate primary and secondary materials, and practice writing papers using the MLA format.

Requirements filled: English Core (Literature)

ENGL 2630
Survey of American Culture

MWF 11:30 – 12:20

Susan Anderson


This class encourages you to combine, cross, and stretch conventional boundaries as you study the diversity and complexity of American cultures at the local, regional, national, and global levels. We will consider the waves of feminism, including #MeToo; examine Civil Rights protest through the film Selma; broaden the meaning of “text” and assess American virtues through a study of Disneyland; and consider diverse perspectives, including a family of survivalists in Idaho as we read Tara Westover’s bestselling memoir, Educated.

Requirements filled: English Core (Culture)

ENGL 3315
Early Modern British Literary History


MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Phebe Jensen


This course introduces students to the literature and culture of early modern England from the reign of Henry VIIIth until just after the English Civil War (approximately 1500-1670).  Students will study major works by preeminent writers of the period—Sir Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton—in the context of the religious, political, and cultural movements of the period, including the humanist movements of the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the exploration and colonization of what Europeans called the New World, ongoing debates about women’s role and authority, and the emergence of new scientific paradigms on the cusp of the seventeenth century scientific revolution, and the English Civil War.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; British), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History)

ENGL 3325

Eighteenth-Century British Literary History: The Marriage Plot from Milton to Austen


TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Mattie Burkert

This course is designed to familiarize you with British literature of what is known as the “long eighteenth century,” which extends from about 1660 to the turn of the nineteenth century. More specifically, we will examine the representation of marriage in the period by reading a wide range of literary texts in a variety of genres. These will include John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost; stage comedies by William Congreve and Susanna Centlivre; philosophical treatises by John Locke; satirical engravings by William Hogarth; Samuel Richardson’s smash hit sentimental novel Pamela and the parodies it inspired; and Jane Austen's quintessential novel of manners, Pride and Prejudice. As we will see, texts that revolve around a “marriage plot” do not merely consider the pleasures and perils of finding a spouse; they also raise questions about gender, sexuality, economics, social class, political subjectivity, religion, and law that continue to resonate today.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; British), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History)

ENGL 3355
Literary History of the Early Americas


MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Keri Holt

This course examines the literature of the early Americas, including writing and oral narratives from indigenous communities, Spanish, French, and British colonial literature from North and South America, and the literature of the early United States. In doing so, we will look at a range of genres, including pictography, letters, essays, exploration narratives, captivity accounts, legends, poems, autobiographies, novels, and drama. Classes will be discussion-based, with an emphasis on exploring varied perspectives in the early Americas, from those in power and those without power, those in the majority and those on the margins. We will also focus on reading works in conjunction with their historical contexts, working closely with primary and secondary sources to develop strong research and analysis skills. By the end of the course, you should have a more thorough understanding of the early history of American literature, as well as how this history, combined with your own critical reading and writing skills, can inform and influence our understanding of American literature and culture in the present.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; American), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; American)

ENGL 3395 
World Literature in Translation: Classical Mythology

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Dr. Steven Shively

The focus for this course will be mostly Greek with some Roman mythology. We’ll read and study time-honored stories of love, war, religion, justice, heroes, villains, and monsters as we learn how a culture’s mythology both reflects and creates its culture. We’ll also look at ways classical myths have influenced later literature. Visual art and music will occasionally complement our study of textual versions of the myths. Specific texts will include Mythology, by Edith Hamilton, for cultural context, background information, and great storytelling; Homer’s The Iliad and The Odyssey; and Medea, by Euripides. This is a reading-heavy course. Requirements will include active participation, reading quizzes, exams, approximately 3 short papers, and a researched argument paper.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; World), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; World)

ENGL 3400
Professional Writing

TR 10:30 – 11:45
AND
TR 12:00 – 1:15

Sherena Huntsman

This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will   will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3410
Professional Writing Technology

TR 3:00 – 4:15

Cana Uluak Itchuaqiyaq  The main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several courses such as ENGL 4410 Document Design and Graphics, and it is a prerequisite for entering the professional and technical communication major. 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3420
Introduction to Fiction Writing

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Anne Stark

 This course is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. The class functions as a community of writers, each supporting one another in creating prose, while understanding the vital importance of the reader in the writing process.  Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected. We practice various models of story generation, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, look at published examples from various genres, and learn the methods of workshopping designed to most effectively critique each other’s work.  These methods come from established writing program protocol. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Creative Writing (Required Intro),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3420

Introduction to Fiction Writing

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Amber Caron

 This course is for students with little or no experience writing fiction. Students will read published stories with a number of questions in mind: What are the components of a story? How do writers create memorable characters? How does time work in a story? How can dialogue reveal character? In what ways does setting evoke emotion? With answers to these and other craft-based questions, students will apply this new knowledge to their own short stories. Writing prompts and exercises will push students to take literary risks, and workshops will help students revise and polish their work. This course will also prepare students for advanced fiction workshops.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3430
Introduction to Poetry Writing

TR 10:30 – 11:45
AND
TR 1:30 – 2:45

Shanan Ballam

In this energetic workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myth and fairytale. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm!

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

MWF 11:30 – 12:20

Robb Kunz

This course will be broken into two parts: the study of creative nonfiction techniques and the crafting of original creative pieces. Students will study/read a wide variety of essays, flash, mixed-media, and illustrative/graphic examples from writers across the creative nonfiction genre. Students will then be asked to mimic form and style from specific writers while incorporating their personal experience and memories. Towards the end of the semester, students will craft an “essay,” in the form of their choice, to workshop with the entire class. Workshop will attempt to teach students how to share their work in a large group setting while communicating constructive impressions/ideas to their peers.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

MW 12:30 – 1:50

Dr. Jennifer Sinor

In this course, we will be establishing the building blocks for creative nonfiction: scene, summary, musing, character, and dialogue. We will focus on autobiographical writing, specifically memoir or personal essay. Creative nonfiction always revolves around the “I,” even when the pronoun makes no appearance on the page, but in memoir and personal essay the “I” is what carries the piece—a thinking mind at work. As Scott Sanders writes, “I choose to write about my experience not because it is mine, but because it seems to open a door through which others might pass.”  Class time is primarily dedicated to full-class workshops with a portfolio of work due at the end of the semester.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3450
Methods and Research in Professional and Technical Communication

MW 11:30 – 12:45

Dr. Rebecca Walton

Technical communicators frequently engage in research to answer questions or address problems in the workplace. This course is designed to prepare you to work successfully as a technical writer by learning how to craft a research question; how to select appropriate methods to address a particular research question; how to ethically collect and analyze data; and how to report research findings and their associated implications (i.e., research-based recommendations). By partnering with a client for the full semester, you will practice applying all that you are learning within a real organizational context, learning about how you can conduct research to address real organizational problems and questions.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Theory)

ENGL 3470
Approaches to Research in English Studies

W 5:15 – 7:45
(Note: This is a blended broadcast course that meets via interactive videoconferencing every other week.)

Dr. Amy Piotrowski

 This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Understanding and using these complementary approaches are particularly appropriate to students in the English Teaching emphasis. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3510
Teaching Young Adult Literature

TR 9:00 – 10:15

Dr. Steven Shively

 

This course is part of the professional training USU offers for future secondary school teachers. The state of Utah mandates a course in Adolescent Literature for grades 6-12 teacher licensure with an English endorsement, and ENGL 3510 meets this requirement. We will read several YAL books, but we will study them through a teaching lens. Among the topics we’ll consider are definitions of young adult literature, the place of YAL in the curriculum, dealing with difficult issues, creating effective lessons, characteristics of adolescents, graphic books, assessment, and evaluation. Class texts include several award-winning YAL novels:

  • The Outsiders, the genre-defining bestseller about violent gang culture in the 1960s
  • Habibi, the story of a female Arab teenager whose father moves the family from their comfortable suburban home in St. Louis to Palestine, where she is attracted to a Jewish boy in an echo of Romeo and Juliet (the author, Naomi Shihab Nye, will visit USU in the spring)
  • Scythe, set in a dystopian future where an organization called the Scythes decides who must die as consequence of the elimination of natural causes of death
  • I Am Alfonso Jones, a graphic novel about a young African American male who is shot and killed by a police officer; he wakes up in the afterlife on a train where his guides are famous historic African Americans
  • Exit, Pursued by a Bear, the story of a high school cheerleader who is drugged and raped at cheerleading camp; the novel presents the pitfalls she faces and her successes as she deals with this crisis. The title comes from a famous stage direction in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale.
  • Probably two additional books students select.

Requirements will include active participation, reading quizzes, writing position papers about teaching YAL, creating units and lessons, and presenting lessons to the class.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3610
Multicultural American Literature

MWF 10:30 – 11:20

Dr. Keri Holt

This course explores the diverse literatures of the United States by examining the work of contemporary Native American, Asian American, Latina/o, and African American writers. The course will focus on a range of genres from the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including short stories, poetry, drama, hip hop, and graphic novels by writers such as Louise Erdrich, Julia Alvarez, Kristen Valdez Quade, Toni Morrison, Luís Alberto Urrea, Edwidge Danticat, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Viet Thanh Nguyen, among many others.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; American), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; American)

ENGL 3700
Regional Folklore

Online

 Dr. Lisa Gabbert This course examines the production of folklore in relationship to region, focusing specifically on regions within the US.  We first discuss the history of the term “region,” and from there move on to examine a variety of expressive forms and the role/s they play in the construction of regional identity, particularly for outsiders.  These include but are not limited to the following: clambaking in New England; Mormon landscapes in the interior West; and hybrid forms along the Arizona borderlands. 

ENGL 3700
Regional Folklore

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Dr. Jeannie Thomas  Study of folklore and folklife as they relate to regional cultures. 

 

ENGL 3710
Topics in Folklore: Chinese Folklore

Online

 Dr. Sophia Geng  In this class, we will read the English translations of popular Chinese folklore, legends, and myths. These include the tale of Mulan, the story of the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl, the legend of He Shi Bi, the myth of Nu Wa and many more fascinating stories from China’s rich oral traditions and folk literature. We will look through the lens of gender and intercultural communication studies to analyze how these stories evolved throughout history and how they were told differently in mainstream and vernacular cultures. Additionally, we will examine a number of adaptations of these stories in film, TV series, opera and dance by Chinese and Chinese American authors, and compare the differences in terms of language, theme, moral and functionality. This course will also expose students to the vibrant folklore communities in China and talk about folklore’s contributions to the formation of cultural identities.

ENGL 3710
Topics in Folklore: Latino Gangs and Cartels

TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Eric Morales

Latino gangs are routinely demonized, affecting public policy and framing our national debates. Yet, they are also romanticized in popular culture with sayings like “that’s gangsta” often used as a compliment to reference the media’s image of a hyper-masculine and sexual man who uses violence to achieve his desires—be they material possessions, drugs, or women. But what constitutes an actual gang? What of female or homosexual gang members? What created gangs and why do they continue to exist?

This class will unpack the realities facing Latino gang members, from adolescent street gangs to international drug cartels. Rather than see gangs solely as sources of crime and violence, we will approach them as alternative social structures that counter the alienation and marginalization resultant from issues of economic and social disparities. In the process, we will provide a holistic understanding of street life, looking at markers of expressive traditions, (tattoos, clothing, lowrider cars, folk religion, hip hop music), as well as a history of systemic social inequities (school to prison pipeline, racial segregation, barriers to education and employment). Throughout the semester, we will problematize issues of social networks, immigration, masculinity & femininity, sexuality, stereotypes, gentrification, and ethnicity. Our discussions of the causes, functions, and rituals of gang culture will be informed with perspectives provided from Folklore, Anthropology, Latino Studies, and Critical Race Theory. While Latino gang culture is the focus, we will cover social concerns that affect numerous disenfranchised populations.

ENGL 4200
Linguistics Structures

Online course

Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont

This is a 3-credit course.  It covers the following areas: morphology, phonology, syntax, child language acquisition, dialects, second language acquisition, world languages, and endangered languages.  It takes you through the process of what it takes to be a linguist and what linguists do.  From sub-Sahara Africa to the Navajo Nation you learn how language makes a human being uniquely equipped to deal with the world around us.  Assessment involves traditional exams, essays, and projects.  This is also a service learning class where you will create a language enhancement experience for a primary school in Uganda.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4210
History of the English Language

MWF 8:30 – 9:20

 

Dr. John McLaughlin

This course will examine the history of the English language from the earliest linguistically determined levels (Proto-Indo-European) up to the present day. It will include not just the nuts and bolts of how the sounds, grammar, and lexicon of the language changed, but also the sociolinguistic context of the role that the language played and how it was used during the run of its recorded history. This will include the rise of English as a modern global language and its role in the origins of pidgins and creoles around the world.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4300
Shakespeare

MWF 10:30 – 11:20

Dr. Phebe Jensen

The purpose of this course is to help students begin (or continue) a life-long process of enjoying Shakespeare’s works; explore the theatrical and cultural contexts that originally informed Shakespeare’s plays; and understand Shakespeare’s works as living texts that have been and continue to be reinterpreted. Students will gain a broader understanding of both Shakespeare’s work and modern reinterpretations as they gain factual knowledge about Shakespeare’s work, the genre of drama, and issues surrounding authorship.  In addition to six Shakespeare plays—A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, King Lear, and The Tempest—students will be required to see five films and read the Caribbean writer Aime Cesaire’s reinterpretation of The Tempest, A Tempest.

Requirements filled: Literature (Required), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching

ENGL 4310
American Writers:
Colson Whitehead’s Remaking of America

TR 12:00 – 1:15

 

Dr. Christopher González

 

Colson Whitehead’s literary imagination has challenged readers to rethink American history, folklore, race relations, and literary genres through often-unexpected narrative turns, challenging storytelling, and reorientation of comfort zones. The winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Carnegie Medal for Fiction, Whitehead has situated himself as a vital part of the 21st century American literary landscape. What do Whitehead’s writings reveal about our notions of American history? How do his forays into speculative genres cause readers to reconceive of what it means to be an American? In an effort to answer these and other questions, this course will dive deeply into Whitehead’s works of fiction, including The IntuitionistJohn Henry DaysZone OneThe Underground Railroad, and more.

Requirements filled: Literature (Authors; American), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

 

ENGL 4350
Studies in Poetry:
How Poetry Can Save the Planet

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

 

Dr. Paul Crumbley

This course explores the work of Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and Robert Frost as major American poets whose writing influenced the poetry of May Swenson. The course pays particular attention to each poet’s writing about the environment and examines emerging scholarly readings that approach these texts within the relatively new and growing field of ecocriticism. Dickinson and Whitman are widely recognized as the two most influential nineteenth-century American poets, both of whom are well known for their writing about the natural world. Frost is also known for his nature poetry, and he is one of the best known and most widely read of all twentieth-century American poets. Swenson admired all three and met Frost in 1957. Her own writing reflects their influence through poems that examine the importance of place and register her sensitivity to the human impact on the natural world. Dickinson and Whitman pair up well with Frost and Swenson in the sense that Dickinson and Frost are both closely associated with New England, while Whitman and Swenson are more closely linked to New York. Even though Swenson grew up in Logan, Utah, and retained a strong attachment to the West, she spent her writing life in and around New York City.

Requirements filled: Literature (Genres), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

ENGL 4400
Professional Editing

TR 9:00 – 10:15

Zarah Moeggenberg  As a technical communicator, you will need editing skills in the workplace. You will need to know how language works and how to make it work for you, as well as how to make it work for others. In this course we emphasize editing skills, and especially editing processes for professional and technical materials and the tools that allow you to do them. Some of the processes included in this course are copymarking, copyediting, proofreading, and editing for inclusivity. You will also learn to comprehensively edit technical documents for content, organization, graphics, and design. This course has 4 major assignments, one of which is community-based and the other is a collaboration with the Center for Innovative Design and Instruction.  

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 4420
Advanced Fiction Writing

TR 12:00 – 1:15

 

Dr. Charles Waugh

 

 

The purpose of this advanced fiction writing course is to allow you to make the step from story dabbler to serious fiction writer, and to help you, as M.S. Bell says, “deploy unconsciously, intuitively, instinctively” the rudimentary skills you learned in the introductory course.  The readings of our own work will be the basis for our workshop discussions, which means you must read the work in advance and come to class prepared with notes to help you give thoughtful, constructive criticism. We will also read exemplary texts to help us better understand what creates good writing, to train ourselves always to read as a writer, and to find how a particular word or sentence contributes to the overall effect. As a writer, you should cultivate a similar approach to life, the goal being to become what Henry James called, “one of the people on whom nothing is lost.” The success of the workshop will depend entirely on your own inventiveness, your complete engagement and full participation, and your abilities to recognize the narratological nuts and bolts of a story, to not be swept along by plot, to be critical but supportive, and to remember that the text is being critiqued, not the author.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4430
Advanced Poetry Writing

F 12:30 – 3:20

 

Dr. Michael Sowder

 

English 4430 is an advanced poetry-writing workshop. Accordingly, much of the work of the semester will involve reading and responding to each other’s work in a rigorous yet supportive environment. Writing workshops were for me the most exciting and rewarding courses I took in college and grad school, and I hope this one will be as rewarding for you.

As you probably know, world literature began with poetry—deriving from religious ritual, magical spells, chants, and incantations. Other forms of creative writing—novels, fiction, and creative nonfiction—derived from poetry. Poetry employs the tools of creative writing in the most intense, compressed, and sophisticated ways possible. If you study the poetry of the last several millennia, you’ll sharpen and hone your writing in whatever genre you ultimately choose to write in. 

In addition to our weekly workshops, we’ll also read several contemporary books of poetry, beginning with a famous twentieth-century collection, Ariel, by Sylvia Plath, and a collection by her equally famous—and infamous—husband, Ted Hughes’s, Birthday Letters.  We’ll also read The Best American Poetry of 2017, a fantastic collection of contemporary poems. Ross Gay’s exuberant A Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude will lighten our mood after Plath and Hughes.  In addition, we’ll read a book by our own professor Ben Gunsberg and a collection of mine, House Under the Moon.  These works will help us deepen our understanding of the diversity of styles and themes of contemporary poetry and help us see how it achieves its power. 

Grades will be based on a portfolio of poems turned in at the end of the semester and class participation.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4440
Advanced Nonfiction Writing

MW 2:00 – 3:20

 

Dr. Jennifer Sinor

The advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the intro course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This semester we are considering the long form, a subgenre of creative nonfiction that is rooted in new journalism. Students will write two essays that are heavily steeped in research. The first essay will rely on the first person with the research working as a metaphor. The second essay will rely on the research for the story/tension with the first person providing example rather than narrative drive.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing) 

ENGL 4500
Teaching Writing

TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4500 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program.  This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices.  The learning activities and projects in this course will help members of the class collectively examine three related concepts:  designing, engaging, and assessing writing experiences.  Broadly, we will study the following questions:  What are meaningful aims for writers?  How do secondary writing teachers prompt students to engage in these purposes?  What kinds of support do students need to achieve these learning goals? Our course texts (Write Like This:  Teaching Real-World Writing Through Modeling and Mentor Texts, Teaching Middle School Writers:  What Every English Teacher Needs to Know, and Using the Workshop Approach in the High School English Classroom:  Modeling Effective Writing, Reading, and Thinking Strategies for Student Success) and additional scholarship will support our investigation into these questions. 

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520/SCED 4300
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms / Clinical Experience II English

TR 10:30 – 11:45

 

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4520 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. Students are required to also register for SCED 4300 (002), the clinical experience that accompanies this course. Paired together, these courses provide an opportunity to peer deeply into classroom moments and learn about teaching and learning from a range of educational stakeholders, including secondary students, peers, mentor teachers, and scholars. Beyond reading about or practicing teaching tasks, these courses aim to help you help you develop a robust understanding of literacy from the perspective of a teacher in diverse classroom settings.  Collectively, we use our course reading (Fires in the Bathroom:  Advice for Teachers from High School Students, Differentiated Instructional Strategies:  One Size Doesn’t Fit All, Educating for Empathy:  Literacy Learning and Civic Engagement, and additional scholarship) and experiences in the clinical to examine classroom teachers’ roles as literacy educators. To that end, you will actively study scholarship related to teaching and learning, observe learners and learning communities, provide instructional support, deliver instruction, and reflect upon your process of becoming a teacher.  Engaging in each of these processes provides an opportunity to grapple with the connection between educational theory and practice.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520/SCED 4300
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms / Clinical Experience II English

W 5:15 – 7:45
(Note: This is a blended broadcast course that meets via interactive videoconferencing every other week.)

Dr. Amy Piotrowski

 

Public schools are serving an increasing number of students who come from diverse backgrounds. Such diversity suggests that one-size-fits-all curriculum and instruction will not serve the varied literacy learning needs of students populating public schools. This course, designed for students in the English Teaching emphasis, will focus on meeting the needs of diverse learners from different ethnic, linguistic, social, and SES backgrounds in addition to learners with disabilities.  You will learn to differentiate lessons for the students in today's secondary English classrooms.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4540
Teaching Creative Writing

T 5:15 – 7:45

Dr. Jason Olsen

 

Students in this course will learn methods for successfully teaching creative writing at multiple levels, from K-12 to college. The strategies taught will include development and management of a classroom creative writing workshop (with an emphasis on teaching the language of creative criticism) and how best to teach literature in a creative writing environment (and teaching students how to read as writers rather than academics). 

Among the methods to be employed over this hybrid course will be the assignment of three books from the 2018 Best American series (poetry, short fiction, and essays) to give material for the enrolled students to learn how best to teach contemporary literature in a creative writing environment. Besides those three volumes, the main text for the semester will be one the students will create: as we work through the different facets of workshops and literature, I will assign students to write on specific creative writing themes (that will be discussed throughout the semester) and after peer workshop and editing, these writing projects will evolve into chapters and the multiple chapters the students contribute will compose a student-created text.

ENGL 4700
Folk Art and Material Culture

T R 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Lisa Gabbert We will be looking at folkloristic approaches to the study of folk art and material culture, including an emphasis on individual artists, the role of creativity in tradition, artistic processes, tools, and materials, and the importance of cultural context. Some time will be spent deconstructing the categories of “art” and “folk art.” Topics range from pottery, textiles, and mortuary art to yard art, tattoos, and home altars.  Books include William Warner Wood’s Made in Mexico: Zapotec Weavers and the Global Ethnic Art Market (Indiana University Press 2008), Jon Kay’s Folk Art and Aging: Life-Story Objects and their Makers (Indiana University Press 2016), and Jeannie Banks Thomas’ Naked Barbies, Warrior Joes, and other Visible Forms of Gender (University of Illinois Press 2003). The course is cross-listed as a graduate course; Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to write a substantial research paper.

ENGL 5310
Contemporary Literature: Postcolonial Science Fiction

TR 10:30 – 11:45

 

Dr. Shane Graham

Postcolonial literature (which, for purposes of this course, refers to writing from Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia) shares a surprisingly large number of themes with science fiction. Both frequently explore issues of colonization, domination, encounters with the Other, and cultural hybridity. Both investigate the disorienting effects of new technologies. Both depict the tensions between center and periphery, and between mimicry and appropriation. And both often try to envision future societies, either as dystopian cautionary tales or as ideals to strive toward.

For these reasons, it should be no surprise that a great deal of science fiction (or, if you prefer the more encompassing term, “speculative fiction”) has emerged from formerly colonized parts of the world in recent decades. This course takes Dawn, published in 1987 by African American novelist Octavia Butler, as a pioneer of what is often called Afrofuturism. It continues with Amitav Ghosh’s novel Calcutta Chromosome (1995). We will then read two novels, one novella, and a large number of short stories published in the last decade, along with a number of academic articles and book chapters that theorize and contextualize the literature. The book list includes: from Nigeria, Nnedi Okorafor’s Binti and Deji Bryce Olokotun’s After the Flare; from South Africa, Mashigo Mohale’s Intruders; and from the Caribbean, Karen Lord’s The Best of All Possible Worlds and Nalo Hopkinson’s Falling in Love with Hominids.

Requirements filled: Literature (Lit & Culture), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

ENGL 5410

Studies in Writing for Digital Media Production

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Zarah Moeggenberg Technical communicators  frequently produce procedural and instructional documentation. In this course, you will get a range of experience with this essential type of technical communication: producing instructions in video, print, and other media formats. You will learn how to develop inclusive and accessible documentation, developing technical documents for diverse audiences in our local and USU communities. You will showcase your competencies through multiple smaller assignments (digital and print-based) and one semester-long assignment (print-based).
 
Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 5420

Project Management in Technical Communication

MWF 9:30 – 10:20

Dr. Avery Edenfield

 

The main focus of this course is learning how to successfully manage complex projects in diverse teams. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be able to demonstrate skills in collaboration, interpersonal communication, multi-tasking, and team writing. In this course, students gain experience in these areas by working on a semester-long project. This course is intended to give students hands-on practice working as a team on a long project with multiple (graded) components. Much of the work for this project is self-directed. Each team is in charge of their own self-designed project (under the guidelines provided). 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 5430

Professional Writing Capstone

W 1:30 – 4:00

Dr. Ryan Moeller

This course is designed to prepare you to successfully negotiate the job market after graduating with a degree in English studies. While the course was designed as a required capstone experience for students in the Professional and Technical Writing emphasis of the major, all students can benefit from a sustained and critical look at their professional identity materials. You will learn how to professionalize and present your experiences as a student/worker/intern to potential employers and to develop successful job materials, such as a portfolio website, resume, cover letter, social media presence, interviewing strategies, and more! 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required)

ENGL 5450

Special Topics in Creative Writing: Novels, Novellas, and Long Stories

TR 9:00 – 10:15

 

Dr. Charles Waugh

 

The purpose of this special topics course is to explore the structures and creative demands of long forms of fiction: novels, novellas, and long stories. Students will read several theories of the novel alongside six exemplary long forms of fiction, map how they are structured, make maps of their own long work, and write 40-60 pages of their own fiction that will be workshopped at the end of the semester.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Required for Students Starting Program Fall 2018) 
ENGL 5490

Marketing and Proposals

MWF 10:30 – 11:30

Dr. John E. McLaughlin

This course will look in detail at how to understand the underlying motivations of consumers based on archetypes and deep metaphors. You will learn how to conduct consumer research through advanced interviewing techniques. You will also look at the role of communication, social media, and on-line networks in marketing and how to build them.  A final component of the class will be using these tools and insights to construct marketing documents including a proposal (either commercial or non-profit). 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL/HIST/ANTHR 5700

Folk Narrative

Online

Dr. Lynne McNeill  This course introduces students to two of the major genres of folk narrative: folktales and legends. Commonly distinguished from each other by their complex relationships to questions of truth, these narrative forms of folklore have been at the base of folkloristic study since the inception of the field. Spanning familiar stories such as Cinderella to modern manifestations like creepypasta, students will focus not only on the stories themselves, but will learn the major scholarly and analytical approaches that folklorists have taken to the study of narrative throughout the history of the discipline. There is a range of options for a final project--from a traditional research essay to conducting fieldwork to writing a creative project--and while this is an online class, there will be plenty of interaction and opportunities to share and appreciate each other's work.