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Fall Semester 2021 Undergraduate Courses

Course

Instructor

Course Description

ENGL 1410
Online

Elements of Grammar

Lezlie Branum-Christensen

This course approaches grammar as a rhetorical tool for both analyzing and accomplishing authorial purposes. It is designed around the foundational premise that grammar is a social construct impacted by factors such as race, gender, and socio-economic class. As such, we examine the power inherent in both Standard English and dialectical grammars by considering the rhetorical contexts in which they operate. We practice identifying and applying concepts of subject, verb, sentence, clause, phrase, and related concepts for editing. We develop improved sentence sense through sentence combining and syntactical manipulation. We study and employ punctuation and mechanics for convention, clarity, and style. These goals are met through regular textual analysis, creation, and classroom collaboration. All course activities are underscored by the dual goals of honoring individuals’ right to their own language while increasing access to the language of wider communication.

ENGL 2200,
MWF 12:30-1:20
and
Online

Understanding Literature

Dr. Lianna Manibog

Storytelling and art are deeply ingrained in the lives of human beings and have been used to explore the experiences, ideas, emotions, doubts, issues, beliefs, and mysteries inherent in daily life. This course explores this narrative drive by giving students a foundation in four genres of literature (poetry, fiction, drama, and literary nonfiction) and a working knowledge of literary concepts and terms.

 

ENGL 2200
MWF 10:30-11:20

Understanding Literature

Deanna Allred

“That is part of the beauty of all literature. You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.” F. Scott Fitzgerald.  This course is an introduction to a variety of literature genres such as fiction, creative non-fiction, drama, and poetry. In this course, we will read from diverse perspectives. We will focus on theme, structure, and literary devices. We will also respond critically to the following questions: How does literature help us understand the human condition? What life-long skills does literature help us develop? What does literature lead us to discover? In what ways do the various forms of literature demonstrate belonging? Together, we will learn about and practice close reading, critical thinking, and reflective writing.

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 2210
MWF 12:30-1:20

Introduction to Folklore

MWF 12:30-1:20

Dr. Afsane Rezaei 

Folklore is the culture that people make for themselves. It is cherished by families, shared among co-workers, danced on the streets by unruly young people, and created on the internet. The forms of folklore circulate from person to person and group to group, adapting to every change of situation and lend themselves to a wide array of social purposes. In this course, we will look at the concept of folklore as emergent and dynamic, and as an integral part of our day-to-day lives. We will review the major genres studied by folklorists, including oral/verbal, customary, and material forms of vernacular culture. Our focus will be on contemporary forms of folklore, including campus traditions, personal narratives, jokes, contemporary and supernatural legends, food traditions and celebrations, occupational folklore, and digital forms of folklore such as internet memes. This is a blended F2F class and students are expected to attend in-person class discussions once a week.

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 2210
MW 1:30-2:45

Introduction to Folklore

Dr. Lisa Gabbert

This course provides an overview of folklore studies, ideas, and key terms using examples from Europe, India, and Japan. We focus primarily on the genres of the European fairy tale, ritual tales, legend, and folk belief. Topics include Scandinavian trolls, Eastern European vampires, and Japanese yokai. The majority of course content will be delivered online through Canvas. Students will be required to attend one f2f discussion class per week.

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 2210
Online

Introduction to Folklore

Dr. Lynne McNeill

This course introduces students to the academic field of Folklore Studies. It explores several major types of folklore—folktale, legend, myth, belief, custom, and material culture—and covers the basic theoretical frameworks in which folklorists study these cultural productions. Students also have hands-on experience collecting, documenting, and archiving the materials of folk culture. The course’s main goals are:

  • to help us think analytically about culture and everyday life
  • to help us become more aware of our own folk behaviors and cultures
  • to help us become more aware of others’ folk behaviors and cultures

Pursuing these goals will not only leave us better educated but also more appreciative of the tremendous role that folklore and folk culture play in shaping human experience. This course will be offered asynchronously online.

ENGL 2220
MWF 12:30-1:20

Introduction to Fiction

Dr. Natalie Aikens

Introduction to Fiction will include “Readings in fiction, including novels, novellas, and stories. The course will examine elements of the genre such as character, plot, theme, and style. Various critical approaches and contexts will be discussed, as well as the historical development of the form.”  Texts may include Henry James’s Daisy Miller, Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Carson McCullers’s The Member of the Wedding, Rudolfo Anaya’s Bless Me, Ultima, Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day, and Patricia Engel’s It’s Not Love, It’s Just Paris.  Assessments will include reading responses, discussion posts, weekly reading/lecture quizzes, and a paper.

ENGL 2300
9:30-10:20

Introduction to Shakespeare

Dr. Megan Snell

This course will introduce nonmajors to Shakespeare on the page, stage, and screen. Sampling from the early modern dramatic genres of comedies, histories, and tragedies, students will consider the literary and performance texts of Shakespeare both within their particular historical and cultural moments of production and as texts that continue to be reshaped and reinterpreted across centuries.

ENGL 2600
Face-to-Face
MW 1:30-2:45

Literary Analysis

Dr. Shane Graham

This course is designed especially for aspiring English majors and minors, but is valuable to anyone wanting to learn fundamental concepts and methods in the study of literature. You will learn the formal elements of three basic genres of literature—poetry, drama, and fiction—and the critical terminology for the kinds of figurative language that characterize literary writing in all genres. We will discuss how to research, organize, and write essays in literary studies, how to cite sources, and how to sharpen your writing style in general. Ultimately, the skills and methods you acquire in this class will help you better appreciate the richness, complexity, and beauty of the works you will read as a student of literature in English, and it will help you begin to develop the critical thinking skills, the mental flexibility, and the ability to cope with ambiguity required for most any career you might pursue. For case studies of literary form, style, and technique, we will turn to the works of three twentieth-century writers: the poems of Derek Walcott, the stories of Langston Hughes, and a play by Lorraine Hansberry.

ENGL 2600
MWF 10:30-11:20

Literary Analysis

Dr. Natalie Aikens

Literary analysis is a “writing-intensive course in literary analysis and research” which “introduces English majors to techniques and problems of critical interpretation” (course catalog). This section of English 2600 will investigate a wide range of poetry including poems by Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Bishop, Cherríe Moraga, David Tomas Martinez, and Jericho Brown.  Our drama unit will include William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and the course will conclude with Gloria Naylor’s novel, Mama Day.  Assessments will include three revised essays and weekly reading quizzes.

ENGL 2600
TR 9:00-10:15

Literary Analysis

Dr. Adena Rivera-Dandas

In this class, we’ll develop our literary analysis toolkit by engaging in various modes of critique as well as the genre expectations of poetry, drama, and fiction. As we learn formal literary analytical techniques we will also ask what it means to tell an American story and what it means to be scholars in the contemporary moment. What analytical tools do we need to develop and how do stories or ways of writing look different from different angles? We’ll read poetry by Danez Smith, Audre Lorde, and Jericho Brown, a play by August Wilson, a musical by Michael R. Jackson, and a novel by Jesmyn Ward.

ENGL 2630
Blended Face-to-Face
TR 9:00-10:15

Survey of American Culture

Dr. Kerin Holt

This section of Survey of American Culture examines the history of protest in the United States. The United States was founded as an act of protest to British taxation and representation policies, and protest has played a dominant role in US culture ever since. This course examines different periods of protest in US history, beginning with the American Revolution and continuing to protests involving indigenous dispossession, slavery, women’s rights and suffrage, labor, and immigration, followed by a critical assessment of the various forms of protests involved in the civil rights movement during the 1960s-70, and concluding with recent protest movements involving the Me Too movement, Black Rights Matter, the Trump administration, and the 2021 takeover of the U.S. Capitol. In examining the history of U.S. protest, we will work with a range of sources, including essays, poems, fiction, advertisements, newspaper articles, songs, posters, visual art, speeches, cartoons, photographs, and film to explore the varied rhetorical strategies and media used to express opposition to government policies and social attitudes and rally attention, support, and conflict in the public sphere.

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 2720
TR 1:30-2:45

American Folklore
Dr. Jeannie Thomas

This course explores the diverse and changing landscape of the United States by analyzing memes, supernatural legends, conspiracy theories, Native American narratives, foodways, and American roots music. Questions covered include:

-What are memes really trying to tell us? Also, do you need to worry about 5G towers? Did Vladimir Putin release 500 lions onto the streets of Russian cities to keep people inside during quarantine?

-Who or what is most likely to haunt you and why? (HINT: It’s someone you know.)

-Who tells conspiracy theories and why? How do you know a conspiracy theory when you see it, and what’s the Denver airport got to do with it?

-What are Windigo economics? Why is the Onondaga Thanksgiving address important, and what do school children learn from reciting it? How does an honorable harvest work?

-How on earth did green jello become the official state snack of Utah? What do funeral potatoes, Polygamy Porter, and pastrami burgers have in common? 

-What types of roots music influenced your own favorite genres of music? How does roots music reveal American history? How is it a form of American literature?

Along the way to answering these and other questions, we’ll expand our cultural and digital literacy. We’ll sharpen our legend and conspiracy theory detectors—plus recipes and music.

ENGL 3030
MWF 9:30-10:20
and
Online

Dr. Jeremy Ricketts

This course will examine literature of the Southwest with a special emphasis on Utah. Authors often use a specific place to reflect, contest, or even attempt to shape regional identity. We will read several texts with the goal of understanding how place can be as important to consider as character, plot, theme, and other traditional literary devices. By analyzing how authors weave place into their stories, we will consider how a place can drive not only narrative but also give us insight into American history and culture, perhaps even teaching us something about ourselves along the way.    

ENGL/HIST 3070
MWF 9:30-10:20
Blended Web Broadcast

Folklore and the Internet

Dr. Lynne McNeill This course introduces students to a major new area of folkloristic research: digital culture. It explores the ways in which we can understand folklore in a digital context, the kinds of folklore we find in digital settings, the kinds of folk groups we find through the use of communication technologies, how fieldwork changes in an online environment, and the ways humans make meaning in diverse contexts. In other words, we'll look to the internet to reveal all sorts of crazy, interesting, confusing, contradictory, appalling, appealing, and generally weird things about contemporary culture. This course will be offered via blended web broadcast.
ENGL/HIST 3070
Online

Folklore and the Internet
Dr. Ehsan Estiri

This course introduces students to a major new area of folkloristic research: digital culture. It explores the ways in which we can understand folklore in a digital context, the kinds of folklore we find in digital settings, the kinds of folk groups we find through the use of communication technologies, how fieldwork changes in an online environment, and the ways humans make meaning in diverse contexts. In other words, we'll look to the internet to reveal all sorts of crazy, interesting, confusing, contradictory, appalling, appealing, and generally weird things about contemporary culture. This course will be offered online.

ENGL 3315
Blended Face-to-Face
MWF 11:30-12:20

Early Modern British Literary History

Dr. Megan Snell

This course will study representations of violations and their consequences in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century British literature, with a particular focus on the popular genres of drama and revenge. Which violations prompt revenge, and what counts as justice in these texts? How can these imaginative portrayals of transgression will help us to discern historical expectations of class, gender, race, religion, and sexuality? In addition to drama, students will examine how authors establish, reinterpret, and cross the boundaries of other literary forms in the period.

ENGL 3345
Zoom
MW 1:30-2:45

Literary History of the British Isles Since 1900
Dr. Michaelann Nelson

This course will introduce students to the major British literary movements and authors from 1900 to the present. At the outset of the twentieth century, Britain was confident in its position as a global power, but that confidence was shaken by World War I. Coined the “lost generation,” writers responded to a new sense of alienation and loss through experimentation in form, genre, narrative perspective, and numerous other ways, ushering in the new literary movement of Modernism. Following Modernism, we’ll focus on post-World War II literature, especially as it relates to the questioning of ideologies and traditional institutions. As former British colonies gained independence, new voices came onto the scene to forge a new British postcolonial identity by the end of the century. The Norton Anthology of English Literature for the Twentieth Century will provide the foundation for our reading, but we’ll linger a little longer on Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, George Orwell’s 1984, and Zadie Smith’s White Teeth.

ENGL 3355
Blended Face-to-Face
TR 10:30-11:45

Literature of the Early Americas

Dr. Kerin Holt

This course examines the literature of the early Americas, including writing and oral narratives from indigenous communities, Spanish, French, and British colonial literature from North and South America, and the literature of the early United States. We examine a range of genres, including pictography, letters, essays, exploration narratives, captivity accounts, legends, poems, autobiographies, novels, and drama. Classes are discussion-based, with an emphasis on exploring varied perspectives and experiences in the early Americas. We will also focus on reading works in conjunction with their historical contexts, working closely with primary and secondary sources to develop strong research and literary analysis skills.

ENGL 3375 
MWF 9:30-10:20

American Literature Since 1900

Dr. Chris González

The American short story is a very particular expression of literature and has evolved to reflect the prevailing zeitgeists and attitudes of the time.  Using only 40 short stories, this course will examine a convergence of literary traditions, genres, and cultural production within the United States over the last 50 years. How do these stories wrestle with certain issues that manifest within US history? How do they engage in specific formal and generic traditions? How might these stories and their authors highlight America’s possibilities as well as shortcomings? These and other questions will motivate our exploration in this course. Authors will include Toni Cade Bambara, Ursula K. Le Guin, Louise Erdrich, George Saunders, Junot Díaz, Percival Everett, Stephen King, Manuel Muñoz and more.

ENGL 3395 
TR 9:00-10:15
Blended Web Broadcast (Zoom)

World Literature in Translation: Medieval African Literature


Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato

This class will offer a survey of both written and oral literary texts from four areas of medieval Africa—1) the Aksum and Ethiopian Empires, 2) the Mali and Songhai Empires, 3) Ife and Benin (and Yoruba culture), and 4) Great Zimbabwe. We will spend time reading and discussing a range of texts, including charters and political writings, religious writings, epic poetry, and songs, as well as learning about different genres of art, including sculpture and architecture. Special attention will be paid to texts that English Education students can bring into their secondary school classrooms.

ENGL 3400 
Online

Writing for the Workplace / Professional Writing

Ryan Cheek

Mat Halaczkiewicz
This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.
ENGL 3400 
Web Broadcast
TR 9:00-10:15 and
TR 10:30-11:45

Writing for the Workplace / Professional Writing

Computer Science Majors
Rachel Bryson

This course introduces you to the field of writing and speaking as a professional in the field of computer science. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to computer science. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences. This course uses a free open access textbook along with other freely available media.

ENGL 3410
Online

Digital Writing Technologies
Samantha Clem

The main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several courses such as ENGL 4400 Professional Editing, and it is a prerequisite for entering the technical communication and rhetoric emphasis.

ENGL 3420
TR 9:00-10:15

Introduction to Fiction Writing

Amber Caron

Covers basic elements of writing fiction: form, structure, plot, theme, characterization, dialogue, point of view, and imagery.

ENGL 3420

Blended Web Broadcast

Introduction to Fiction Writing

TBA

Covers basic elements of writing fiction: form, structure, plot, theme, characterization, dialogue, point of view, and imagery.

ENGL 3430
TR 1:30-2:45

Poetry Writing

Dr. Michael Sowder

English 3430 is an introductory poetry-writing workshop. In this class we will explore and experiment with writing different kinds of poetry, from classical formal poems, to video poems and spoken word poems. We’ll be using a wonderful introductory text, Steven Kowit’s In the Palm of Your Hand, as well as reading a broad selection of contemporary poets, including poets of our own, here at USU. We’ll watch an awesome film about poetry, and videos, too. Analyzing poems, old and new, we’ll see how they achieve their power, and we’ll learn from each other by sharing poems in large and small group workshops. Students will write and revise ten new poems, including several poems in form. 

ENGL 3430
MWF 11:30-12:20

Poetry Writing



Dr. Benjamin Gunsburg

English 3430 is an introductory poetry-writing workshop. In this class, we will read, write, and discuss many kinds of poetry, from free verse, to formal verse, to experimental work. We’ll be using Steven Kowit’s In the Palm of Your Hand, as well as two books by two of our own faculty members. Our conversations will revolve around craft, which means we’ll explore those time-tested concepts and techniques that guide and strengthen poets’ efforts.  This approach begins with close attention to the language that moves us and careful consideration of why it moves us. We’ll analyze poems, old and new, and we will learn from each other by workshopping poems in large and small group workshops. As a final project, students will complete a poetry portfolio comprised of ten new poems and a reflection letter.    

ENGL 3440
MWF 12:30-1:20

Creative Nonfiction Writing


Robb Kunz

This introduction to creative nonfiction will introduce students to contemporary writers within an increasingly hard to define genre. Students will study the narrative approaches and techniques employed by professional writers, while being asked to apply that knowledge to the crafting of their own creative nonfiction pieces. Students will work in small group workshops as well as taking part in a whole class workshop.

ENGL 3440
TR 12:00-1:15

Creative Nonfiction Writing

 
TBA English 3440 will focus on crafting nonfiction. Few parameters will be placed on the subjects of the writing projects, but the class will emphasize narrative and personal writing. Assignment mediums will include traditional essays and experiments in new media. We will hone existing skills and work to create new ones through a mix of lectures, workshops and out-of-class assignments. 
ENGL 3450 
TR 9:00-10:15

Workplace Research


TBA Technical communicators frequently engage in research to answer questions or address problems in the workplace. This course is designed to prepare you to work successfully as a technical writer by learning how to craft a research question; how to select appropriate methods to address a particular research question; how to ethically collect and analyze data; and how to report research findings and their associated implications (i.e., research-based recommendations). By partnering with a client for the full semester, you will practice applying all that you are learning within a real organizational context, learning about how you can conduct research to address real organizational problems and questions.

ENGL 3460
TR 12:00 - 1:15

Rhetorical Theory

 

Dr. Jared Colton

Prepares students to analyze persuasive communication as it is enacted in a variety of texts and contexts. Students learn to define and understand rhetorical situations and theories and to evaluate rhetorical strategies.

ENGL 3470
Online

Research English Studies
Dr. Joyce Kinkead This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)
ENGL 3500
MW 1:30-2:45

Teaching English

Dr. Benjamin Gunsberg

Admission to STEP is required. The Teaching English course is paired with the one-credit course, SCED 3300 Clinical 1 (English) to provide students with hands-on experience working in secondary school classrooms. Students will meet in class and also work in schools 30 hours over the semester. The goal of the clinical experience is for pre-service teachers to begin to view the classroom and its students from the perspective of a teacher. Throughout your undergraduate education, you have focused on subject matter content; in this experience, you’ll be looking more closely at the process of teaching and learning. In particular, you’ll be observing how a teacher functions in the classroom as well as the teacher’s relationships with students, parents, colleagues, and school leaders. You will also have the opportunity to practice teaching in the classroom.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required); English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3510
MWF 9:30-10:20

Teaching Young Adult Literature

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 3510 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices. Through the process of reading and discussing a wide range of diverse young adult literature, we will explore central trends and issues in the field of Young Adult Literature and a variety of ways of interpreting, analyzing, and teaching YA Lit. Throughout all of our work together, we will look to theories and research about reading, literature, and teaching in order to contextualize, understand, and problematize our own theories and experiences. This course, then, will ultimately help you understand who you hope to become as a literature teacher and participate in our profession’s conversations about the teaching of YA Lit.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required); English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3630
Online

Farm Literature
Dr. Joyce Kinkead

This Depth-Humanities/Arts course explores the theme of agriculture, food, and land and also requires extensive reading and writing to meet the objectives of the CI criteria. The Farm in Literature and Culture investigates the “culture of agriculture.” Students read classical texts that provide a foundation and other texts of the American farm. We also explore farming through the lens of art, architecture, popular culture, and genre. By reading fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as viewing film and visual arts, students will enhance their understanding of the role that agriculture, food, and land have played in American life. 

ENGL/HIST 3700
Online

Regional Folklore
Dr. Ehsan Estiri

In the Fall 2021 semester, this course will orient students to the folklore and folkloric practices of the Middle East. Material to be examined will be diverse across genres and drawn from various ethnic, national, and temporal spheres. Folklore is not necessarily ancient and historical, and there will be an emphasis on Middle Eastern contemporary life. IN this course, folklore is conceptualize as everyday life expressive culture, including verbal arts, texts, performative activities, and material culture. Though this is not a theory course, students will gain an attenuated background in folklore studies that includes the history and development of the discipline, its various methods, and contemporary scholarly conversations. This course will be offered online.

ENGL/HIST 3710
MWF 10:30-11:20

Topics in Folklore: Children's Folklore
Dr. Lisa Gabbert

This course focuses on the culture of children by examining children’s traditions and children’s folklore. Materials to be examined include games, stories, songs, rhymes, and other verbal routines created and adapted by children for children. Children’s literature—material written by adults for children—will not be covered. The course is organized around themes that arise in childhood traditions, including play and power; violence and danger; and gender. The majority of course content will be delivered online through Canvas. Students will be required to attend one f2f discussion class per week.

ENGL 4210
Online

History of the English Language: Change and Diversity Online

Dr. John McLaughlin

This course introduces the linguistic history of English, beginning with its Indo-European roots and continuing through Old English and Middle English to contemporary usage. It covers sociolinguistic aspects of English language use, dialects, and global diversity.


Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4300
MWF 12:30-1:20

Shakespeare
Dr. Megan Snell

Sampling from different early modern dramatic genres, we will read six Shakespeare plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Henry IV: Part 1, Macbeth, and a final play chosen by class vote. We will explore the purposes of playing within Shakespeare’s drama—including plays-within-plays and role playing—and the literary form of the play itself, now inextricably linked to Shakespeare in literature and culture. Students will develop close reading, research, and writing skills to analyze and enjoy Shakespeare on the page, stage, and screen. This course considers the literary and performance texts of Shakespeare both within their particular historical moments of production and as texts that continue to be reshaped and reinterpreted across centuries. In final projects, students will choose how to delve into these texts in various analytical, creative, and pedagogical ways.

ENGL 4300
Blended IVC and Online
R 5:15-7:45

Shakespeare
Dr. Alan Blackstock

This course provides an overview of Shakespeare’s drama and poetry--tragedies, comedies, histories, romances, and sonnets--and examines his work in the historical contexts that produced it, along with the philosophical, political, and social questions it continues to raise. The class text is The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd edition. The course is delivered in a blended (alternating) format, meeting one week via IVC broadcast and the next week online.

ENGL 4310
Blended IVC and Online
M 5:15-7:45

American Writers
(Willa Cather & Marilynne Robinson)
Bob King

“How shall I live my life?” is a question at least as ancient as Aristotle. How might I “express myself,” or locate my “authentic self” or find “subjective well-being” are more modern projects, and one function of literature may be to provide illumination and enduring wisdom on such matters. What, for example, makes for a transcendent, transforming engagement with nature rather than an ordinary one? Willa Cather’s protagonists farming the prairies or absorbed in the American desert, embody the possibilities for a transforming relationship with the American landscape, while Marilynne Robinson’s novels explore the impact of family and history on our lives. This course will survey selected works of Cather and Robinson with these themes in mind, with attention as well to biographical, historical and other critical aspects of their work. Responding to a dynamic, transforming nation, they narrate a critical engagement with an emerging modernity that perhaps pushes them closer to the natural world, community, and an experience of an elusive authenticity.

“We can perceive only what we are capable of perceiving,” it has been said—but who achieves that discernment? The assignments, we hope, allow you the freedom to explore these and other issues the reading engages.

ENGL 4320 
Online

British Writers (Jane Austen)
Dr. Brian McCuskey

In this course, we will study the arc of Jane Austen’s fiction, from the juvenilia she wrote and performed as a teenager to the draft of a novel she left unfinished on her death.  We will read five out of her six published novels (holding out Mansfield Park for your future enjoyment), discussing their connections to one another as well as to their historical context.  How does Jane Austen’s perspective as a novelist evolve, and how can we incorporate it into our own worldview?  What makes her famously ironic voice so instantly recognizable, and how can we take her style as a model for our own writing?  In what ways does Austen’s fiction reflect on itself, as it raises questions about reading, writing, and art?  We will also discuss recent pop-cultural adaptations of Austen, whose plots turn out to predict not only the rise of the American teenager but also the fall of the zombie apocalypse.

ENGL 4350
TR 12:00-1:15
Blended Web Broadcast (Zoom)

Studies in Poetry: Medieval Romance

Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato

This course will examine the history of medieval romance poetry, with a focus on England. We’ll start with the Lais of Marie de France and read several romances in Middle English as well as modern English, including J.R.R. Tolkien’s translations of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Sir Orfeo, and Pearl. Our discussions will range widely, but the foci of the course will be on depictions of gender and sexuality as well as religion and race. We will discuss the origins of the romance genre—which arose in part from medieval Arab translations and interpretations of Greek and Roman medical texts—and emphasize how the genre of romance speaks to networks of mercantile and literary trade in the Middle Ages. We will end the semester by reading Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant, a novel that draws deeply from medieval romance poetry.

ENGL 4365
MWF 9:30-10:20

Studies in Film
Dr. Natalie Aikens From the classic cinema of Gilda (1946) andWest Side Story (1961) to more contemporary Latinx cinema such as Selena (1997), The Book of Life (2014), and Roma (2018), Latina actresses and Latina-centric stories have captivated US and international audiences.  This course will investigate portrayals of Latinas on the large screen from the mid-twentieth century to the present.  Many of the films will be available through the USU library or Amazon Prime; an HBO Max account for one month may be required to screen some of the films.  In addition to the films above the course films may include Pretty Vacant, Maria Full of Grace, Chico y Rita, Real Women Have Curves, Colombiana, and Signature Move.  Assessments will include film reviews, a midterm, a paper, and a podcast.  
ENGL 4380
TR 1:30-2:45

African American Literature
Dr. Adena Rivera-Dandas

In his memoir Heavy, Kiese Laymon writes “telling the truth was way different from finding the truth, and finding the truth had everything to do with revisiting and rearranging words. Revisiting and rearranging words didn’t only require vocabulary; it required will, and maybe courage.” What does it mean to “find” truth? Why does it require courage to do so? In this class, we will look at Black writers who revise, revisit, rearrange, rearticulate the world while imagining revisions of our own. What does it mean to change our minds? How does that happen through literature and form? What is specific about an African American experience that necessitates rearticulation? We will pursue these questions both through reading a novel (Toni Morrison), two memoirs (Kiese Laymon and Audre Lorde) and selected poetry (Claudia Rankine and Eve Ewing) as well as collaboratively revising our writing and interrogating what academic writing can and should be.

ENGL 4400
TR 10:30-11:45

Professional Editing
TBA

Whether or not your job title includes the word “editor,” you will find that good editing skills are an excellent way to move ahead in your workplace. A good professional/technical editor understands how language works, how others will likely expect it to be used, and how to craft it effectively—not just by copyediting and proofreading but also by editing comprehensively for content, organization, style, graphics, and document design. Most of your work in this course will be hands-on editing.

By the end of the course, you should be able to do these things:

  • Evaluate documents’ editing needs and state specific editing priorities and objectives for the given rhetorical situation,
  • Copyedit and comprehensively edit documents written for a variety of audiences and/or clients, using both traditional copy marking and proofreading methods and electronic editing methods,
  • Assess the ethical, social, and technological implications of editing and act responsibly in light of these implications.
ENGL 4410 
MWF 8:30-9:20

Document Design/Graphics
Jamal-Jared Alexander

This course will provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge about document design to enable you to make and defend design decisions when creating documents for professional contexts. You will learn about the human visual system and how the human body perceives visual information. You will learn about interaction design, typography, color, and graphics. You will apply your skills by designing portfolio-worthy documents to solve problems through design. There is no required textbook for this class, but you will need access to screencasting software, which is available for free in the RBW computer lab or online for less than $20.

ENGL 4420
TR 1:30-2:45

Advanced Fiction Writing



Dr. Charles Waugh

The purpose of this advanced fiction writing course is to allow you to make the step from story dabbler to serious fiction writer, and to help you, as M.S. Bell says, “deploy unconsciously, intuitively, instinctively” the rudimentary skills you learned in the introductory course.  The readings of our own work will be the basis for our workshop discussions, which means you must read the work in advance and come to class prepared with notes to help you give thoughtful, constructive criticism. We will also read exemplary texts to help us better understand what creates good writing, to train ourselves always to read as a writer, and to find how a particular word or sentence contributes to the overall effect. The success of the workshop will depend on your own inventiveness, your complete engagement and full participation, and your abilities to recognize the narratological elements of a story, to not be swept along by plot alone, to be critical but supportive, and to critique the text, not the writer. 

ENGL 4430 
TR 10:30-11:45

Advanced Poetry Writing



Dr. Michael Sowder

Writing Nature

English 4430 is an advanced poetry-writing workshop. This semester, we will devote ourselves to reading and writing poems that respond to the natural world, landscapes, and the environment. We’ll be reading classic poems of the natural world, such as the classical Tang Dynasty Chinese poets Tu Fu, Li Po and Sung Dynasty,Cold Mountain, Japanese poets Basho and Issa, British Romantic poets Wordsworth and Keats, Native American poets, such as Simon Ortiz, N. Scott Momaday, Natalie Diaz, early Puritan American poets like Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor, as well as contemporary nature poets, such poets as Gary Snyder, Kenneth Rexroth, Mary Oliver, Pattianne Rogers, Robert Wrigley, Christopher Cokinos, and our own Shanan Ballam, Ben Gunsberg, and Yours Truly. We will learn from each other by workshopping poems in large and small workshops. You will write a chapbook of nature poems, which you will be able to send out for publication.

ENGL 4440
TR 3:00-4:15

Advanced Nonfiction Writing


Russell Beck

The advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the introduction course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This term, students will explore audio essays and podcasts. Students will study examples of audio stories to better understand options related to structure, narrative, and research. Students will learn basic audio editing and recording techniques and complete one audio essay and one nonfiction pilot podcast episode that could be serialized.

ENGL 4500
W 5:15-7:00 pm

Teaching Writing
Dr. Amy Piotrowski

English 4500 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program.  This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices.  The learning activities and projects in this course will help members of the class collectively examine three related concepts:  designing, engaging, and assessing writing experiences.  Broadly, we will study the following questions:  What are meaningful aims for writers?  How do secondary writing teachers prompt students to engage in these purposes?  What kinds of support do students need to achieve these learning goals? Our course texts will support our investigation into these questions.

ENGL 4510 
MWF 11:30-12:20

Teaching Literature

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4510 prepares students to teach literature, including print literature, film, television, and print journalism. The course explores a variety of pedagogical strategies for teaching diverse literary traditions to students of various backgrounds and developmental levels. Students will engage both the philosophical and practical dimensions of secondary English teaching by reflecting on readings, designing units, and delivering instruction to one another. Woven into this course will be opportunities for regular writing, examination of digital resources, and sustained work on a piece of literature that is of special interest to each student. Students will build a library of digital and print-based professional resources that will support their efforts within and beyond this course. Engaging the complexities of lesson planning and assessment, students will create a unit centered on a literary text(s) of their choosing. 

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520/
SCED 4300
M 4:00-7:00

Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms/Clinical Experience II English

Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont

Admission to STEP required. Schools serve an increasing number of students who come from diverse backgrounds. Such diversity suggests that one-size-fits-all curriculum and instruction will not serve the varied literacy learning needs of students. This course, designed for students in the English Teaching emphasis, will focus on meeting the needs of all learners. You will learn to differentiate lessons for the students in contemporary secondary English classrooms. You must register for both ENGL 4520 and SCED 4300 in the same semester.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)/ English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 5400
M 4:00-7:00

Technology and Activism


Dr. Natalie Aikens NBC’s The Voice has since April of 2011 highlighted American talents that may have previously escaped the notice of the country’s talent scouts and recording studios.  The show has brought to light (and center stage) the voices of those that would likely otherwise be unheard by such a broad, national audience.  Testimonial literature functions in a similar way to illuminate the singular voices of marginalized peoples often catapulting stories and people to (inter)national limelight.

The testimonio has long been an important genre in Latin American literature.  George Yúdice defined the testimonio in 1985 as a text which represents an “exorcising and setting aright official history.”  Testimonial literature, however, is not unique to Latin America; in fact, testimonial literature plays a critical role in what we today call American Literature, a set of texts that encompasses writing and orature by Native Americans, Europeans colonizing the Americas, African Americans, Asian Americans, the Latinx populace, and increasingly women.  This course will ask the question in a post-#MeToo world of what it means to testify, to bear witness to a particular experience or event in literature of the Americas.  The texts in this course will represent not only a broad geographical, but also a broad temporal sphere ranging from the sixteenth-century histories of Father Bartolomé de las Casas to the nineteenth-century writings of Mary Prince, Juan Francisco Manzano, Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, and the twentieth- and twenty-first-century writings of Rigoberta Menchú, Toni Morrison, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Díaz, Isabel Allende, and Claudia Rankine.

ENGL 5400
MW 1:30-2:45
Web Broadcast

Technology and Activism


Dr. Avery Edenfield

In this topics course, students examine the role of ethics and social justice in technical communication, learning to connect theory and heuristics with applied expertise and decision making. Drawing on rhetorical, cultural, and critical theories, this class interrogates the intersection of gender, rhetoric, and technology, specifically as they relate to technical communication as a field and as a profession. Students will explore this territory through a range of technical communication topics including aesthetics and design, UX, (dis)ability, and embodiment. This class will explore these topics with an intersectional lens regarding race, class, and sexuality.

Related to the intersections of gender, rhetoric, and technology, students will:  

  • Learn to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view
  • Learn to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)
  • Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

In addition to completing regular reflections on the assigned reading, students will conduct research and write papers. There is no required textbook for this class.

ENGL 5430

Technical Communications Capstone

TBA

Students study how to successfully negotiate the job market in fields related to English, such as technical communication, user experience (UX), and publishing. Students learn how to professionalize; to develop successful job application materials such as a portfolio website, resumes, cover letters, and social media profiles; and to prepare for job interviews.

ENGL 5490
Online

Marketing as Story


Dr. John McLaughlin

Students study topics designed to enrich their understanding of technical communication and rhetoric. Topics, which vary by instructor, have included crisis communication, ethics and technology, marketing and public relations, and user experience design and testing.


Summer Semester 2021 Courses

 

Course   

Instructor  

Course Description 

ENGL 4640/       
WILD 4640
Broadcast and f2f field segment

Studies in the American West

Dr. Alan Blackstock

This course combines readings of literary and historical accounts of rivers in the U.S. West with exploration of contemporary issues of western water management. The course will be offered during the summer semester as a 7-week broadcast class, with a four-day field experience segment in the Uintah Basin, which will include a trip on the Green River and visits to relevant local sites such as Dinosaur National Monument. The course will be team-taught by English and Wildland Resource Management faculty members. Student learning will be assessed with creative writing assignments and formal essays and research papers.



Spring Semester 2021 Undergraduate Courses

Course

Delivery Method  

Instructor  

Course Description

ENGL 1410
Elements of Grammar


  

Web Broadcast
MWF 12:30-1:20

Deanna Allred


Together, we will discuss the importance of form and function pertaining to English grammar. We will also discover how language, knowledge, and power work in texts. While traditional grammar instruction often causes the writer to lose confidence in their writing, this course will focus on helping students experiment with their writing and understand the rhetorical nature of grammar. During the semester, we will be learning about basic sentence structure and then applying the principles of these structures to your own writing and reading.  Through an examination of the various parts of the sentence, you should be better prepared to approach editing and teaching tasks. 

Web Broadcast
MWF 11:30-12:20
Paige Smitten In this class, you will learn about basic sentence structure and then apply the principles of these structures to exercises and to your own writing. We will begin with sentence elements and move to the relationships between and among the elements. The course will provide you with the terminology and definitions of traditional grammar, explain the structure of the English sentence, facilitate and understanding of usage and punctuation, and help you understand how/why grammar matters and functions in society.
 
Asynchronous Online Lezlie Christensen-Branum

This course approaches grammar as a rhetorical tool for both analyzing and accomplishing authorial purposes. It is designed around the foundational premise that grammar is a social construct impacted by factors such as race, gender, and socio-economic class. As such, we examine the power inherent in both Standard English and dialectical grammars by considering the rhetorical contexts in which they operate. We practice identifying and applying concepts of subject, verb, sentence, clause, phrase, and related concepts for editing. We develop improved sentence sense through sentence combining and syntactical manipulation. We study and employ punctuation and mechanics for convention, clarity, and style. These goals are met through regular textual analysis, creation, and classroom collaboration. All course activities are underscored by the dual goals of honoring individuals’ right to their own language while increasing access to the language of wider communication.

 
ENGL 2200
Understanding Literature
Hybrid F2F MWF 1:30-2:45


Robb Kunz English 2200 will introduce students to three specific genres of literature: fiction, nonfiction and poetry. The course will also discuss elements of drama, film, and graphic novel. Students will be asked to read and discuss long and short form literature, while examining techniques and critical approaches to the study of each particular genre. 
Asynchronous Online  Russell Winn English 2200 is an introduction to representative works of world literature including short fiction, poetry, and theatrical plays/films.  The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. Texts are selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving human experience and character. An important goal of the class is to promote an understanding of the works in their cultural/historical contexts and of the enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions. Students will respond critically to readings through class discussion and written, evidence-based arguments.

Asynchronous Online  Carrie Icard

Understanding Literature is an introductory survey course that welcomes any student looking to fulfill the Breadth Humanities requirement, or someone who is interested in literature and “always wanted to try” a first course. Students will focus on analytical readings in literature, with attention to types, terms, and historical development.  Emphasis will be on approaching selected texts with understanding and appreciation.  Readings will include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama.

Online (Statewide)  Ted Andra  

ENGL 2210
Intro to Folklore 


Asynchronous Online
 Lisa Gabbert  

 

Asynchronous Online
Afsane Rezaei

Folklore is the culture that people make for themselves. It is cherished by families, shared among co-workers, and danced on the streets by unruly young people! The forms of folklore circulate from person to person and group to group, adapting to every change of situation and lend themselves to a wide array of social purposes. In this course, we will look at the concept of folklore as emergent and dynamic, and as an integral part of our day-to-day lives. We will review the major genres studied by folklorists, including oral/verbal, customary, and material forms of vernacular culture. Our focus will be on contemporary forms of folklore, including campus traditions, personal narratives, jokes, contemporary and supernatural legends, food traditions and celebrations, occupational folklore, and digital forms of folklore such as internet memes.

Online (Statewide) Ehsan Estiri  In this course, we will investigate the concept of folklore and review the major genres studied by folklorists, while focusing on the concept of folklore as emergent and dynamic—as an integral part of our day-to-day lives. We will explore different forms of vernacular culture, including oral/verbal, customary, and material folklore, and consider various interpretive and theoretical approaches to the examples of folk culture discussed. We will particularly explore contemporary forms of folklore, including urban/supernatural legends, personal narratives, jokes, food traditions and celebrations, occupational folklore, folk art, and digital forms of folklore such as internet memes.

 


ENGL 2300
Intro to Shakespeare 

Asynchronous Online Curtis Icard

The course is an introduction to reading Shakespeare--as a subject for college study, and also as an individual intellectual and artistic experience. Representative plays and other texts will be discussed, with attention to characters, language, and meaning, and to such matters as Comedy and Tragedy. We will focus on building skill, confidence, and pleasure as readers of Shakespeare. The class fulfills a General Education requirement in the Humanities (BHU).

ENGL 2600
Literary Analysis

Asynchronous Online


Natalie Rogers

In this online course, students will analyze the three major genres of literature—poetry, drama, and prose narrative. Students will learn how to compose an effective literary argument, offer effective textual support, and articulate their ideas in an academic setting. We will read works by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, Etgar Keret, Carmen Maria Machado, George Saunders, and Claudia Rankine, among others.

Blended Web Broadcast 
TR 9:00-10:15

Megan Snell
 
 This course will introduce students to fundamental strategies of literary analysis by close reading and contextualizing different forms of literature, such as novels, film, short stories, poems, and a play. Authors will include Margaret Atwood, Kazuo Ishiguro, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Ling Ma. Students will develop their own thoughtful and creative readings of these texts through a sustainable and scaffolded writing process.


Blended Web Broadcast 
TR 10:30-11:45
Natalie Aikens  Literary analysis is a “writing-intensive course in literary analysis and research” which “introduces English majors to techniques and problems of critical interpretation” (course catalog). This section of English 2600 will investigate a wide range of poetry including poems by Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Bishop, Cherríe Moraga, and David Tomas Martinez.  Our drama unit will include William Shakespeare’s A Merchant Venice, and the course will conclude with Toni Morrison’s novel, The Song of Solomon.  Assessments will include three revised essays and weekly reading quizzes.

Office Hours: Mon, Weds 2-3pm (or by appointment)

ENGL 2630
Survey of American Culture
Blended Web Broadcast 
MW 1:30-2:45
Dustin Crawford
In this course, we examine the intersection of war and American culture in literature, film, speeches, and music from the Vietnam era to present. Students will evaluate documentaries and readings from myriad perspectives, and then synthesize the role war and peace movements play in shaping American values, global presence, and militarism.
 
Blended Web Broadcast 
TR 10:30-11:15
Susan Andersen
This class encourages you to combine, cross, and stretch conventional boundaries as you study the diversity and complexity of American culture through the lens of “The Year of the Woman.” You will find fun and challenge as you examine the work of culture through literature, film, television, music, art, history, politics, and more: From Laura Esquivel’s 
Like Water For Chocolate to Tara Westover’s bestselling memoir Educated; from the 1930 short film Triflesto contemporary blockbuster Lady Bird; from Susan B. Anthony to SCOTUS’s RBG; from June Cleaver to Wonder Woman, you will explore the intersection of women and American culture in all its complexities. 
Blended Web Broadcast 
W
 5:15-7:45
Robert King  

Whether it’s “the best of times” or “the worst of times” in our American experience, it is certainly a time of challenge and change—political, economic, technological, social, unsettling  our sense of the meaning of America, our narratives of national purpose and meaning—or providing an opportunity to revise those narratives. A survey of American literary, historical, and cultural works will allow us to examine the roots of American culture, with a key focus on dignity and on what it means to be a citizen in a democracy—what does the government owe you, what do you owe the government and community? Should you wear a mask? And after a distinctive political year, what is the condition of our democratic institutions? Why are our politics now so partisan and polarizing? Can we answer these questions by the end of the semester?

ENGL 3030
Perspectives in Literature
Blended Web Broadcast 
W
 5:15-7:45
Robert King


Our focus will be on the American culture of personal transformation and creed of social mobility and self-development. These values are very much rooted in American literature, from the Puritans’ preoccupation with personal salvation, Ben Franklin’s “rags to riches” narrative, through Emerson and Thoreau’s expression of American Romanticism (rugged individualism in a sublime key), up to its contemporary forms and expressions—self-help podcasts, “makeovers,” yoga stretching itself across the country, transformations in gender and racial identities. Other issues include the extent transformation is communal or relational, as opposed to autonomous and personal, and how it relates to “the pursuit of happiness,” especially in Pandemic times and our own experience. Several readings will focus on the Southwest desert as a landscape of personal transformation.

 
ENGL 3305
Medieval Literary History
Blended Web Broadcast 
MWF 9:30-10:20
Christine Cooper-Rompato

This class will offer a survey of medieval literature focusing on the British Isles. We will start the class with Old English (Anglo-Saxon) literature from England (including Beowulf and the haunting elegy “The Wife’s Lament”) and then trace the history of England and its literature as it is invaded by the Danes (Vikings) and the French. Along the way we will read Arthurian tales from the Welsh Mabinogian and the Old French Lais of Marie de France, Irish lyrical poetry, and Icelandic sagas. We will end the semester by diving into Middle English, the precursor of modern English, as we read several of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Expect tales of battle, woe, love, and longing, as well as a healthy dose of the supernatural. This class is a blended web broadcast, meaning that we will be meeting via zoom and also completing work online. We will meet for class zooms twice a week (Mondays and Wednesdays); Fridays will feature your online work, including watching my brief Friday lecture before posting on a small group discussion board. Students should expect to write three formal essays that are 4-5 pages in length as well as post and reply on weekly discussion prompts; students will also take comprehension quizzes that can be retaken if needed.

ENGL 3335
19th Century British Literature History
Asynchronous Online Brian McCuskey This course introduces students to 19th-century British literature and its historical context, with an emphasis on four major themes: Industry and Society, Ladies and Gentlemen, Science and Religion, and Fantasy and the Fin de Siecle.  This semester, we will pay special attention to the relationship between literature, history, and visual art: Victorian portraits, paintings, pictures, and photos.  On one level, we will juxtapose texts and images: for example, reading Tennyson’s poem “The Lady of Shalott” next to Waterhouse’s painting of the Lady in her boat, or Gaskell's "Our Society at Cranford" next to a painting of nearby urban Manchester.  On another level, we will also analyze the representation of visual art within literary texts: for example, the portrait that hangs on the wall in Browning’s “My Last Duchess,” or the one of Irene Adler that sits on Sherlock Holmes’s desk.  The goal is to learn to develop ideas that bring together text, image, and history.
  Alan Blackstock

In their volume of poems entitled Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth and Coleridge revolutionized poetic practice and ushered in what came to be known as the Romantic movement, with artistic, cultural, and political consequences that resonated throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and continue to be felt today. This course surveys British literature of the nineteenth century with a view toward  providing  students a familiarity with the major authors of the period—both Romantic poets and Victorian novelists--and an understanding of how their work reflects the social, political, economic, moral, and religious issues of the time in which it was written.

ENGL 3355
Literature of the Early Americas
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 12:00-1:15
Natalie Aikens

This course will investigate a wide range of writing and orature composed in and about the Early Americas from its beginnings to 1800.  The texts will include Native American orature, epistolary writing by Europeans colonizing the Americas, as well as poems, essays, personal narratives, and early fiction by literary and political luminaries.  The Blended Web Broadcast format will allow us to combine discussion (via Zoom), lecture, and written responses.  Assessments will include papers, reading responses, discussion posts, and weekly reading/lecture quizzes.

ENGL 3375
Literary History of the U.S. since 1900-ish
  Nathan Straight

So much of studying a nation’s literature revolves around the story you want to tell, and we are best served when we consider resistant as well as centered narratives of American identity. This survey is organized around three major periods and their related social and political movements: 1) the rise of realism and its expressions in naturalism and regionalism; 2) modernism and the aesthetic responses to two world wars; 3) postmodernism and the growth of the personal as political. We will encounter works from multiple genres—including fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction—and consider them in their larger cultural and historical contexts.

ENGL 3385
Postcolonial World Literature
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 3:00-4:15
Shane Graham

In this course we will study literature from island colonies and postcolonies in the Caribbean and the Pacific, including Barbados, Hawai’i, Jamaica, Martinique, New Zealand, Samoa, and St. Lucia. Most of these texts are by people of color and either written in English or translated from French. The earliest were published in 1912, while the most recent were published in the last five years. They explore motifs you might expect from island literatures: of seas and seascapes, marine life, fishermen and sailors, ships, interconnection, and isolation. And the texts explore themes we frequently find in postcolonial literature more generally: of oppression and power and resistance; of migrancy and homecoming; of internalized inferiority complexes and the need to “decolonize the mind”; of culture clashes and tensions between modernity and tradition, and the cultural and linguistic hybrids that emerge from them. Most of the readings will consist of short stories, poems, plays, and essays made available as PDFs on Canvas. We will also read Aimé Césaire’s long narrative poem Journal of a Homecoming, and two novels: Andrea Levy’s Small Island and Sia Fiegel’s Where We Once Belonged.

ENGL 3400
Writing for the Workplace
Asychronous Online Erica Leigh   


This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

ENGL 3410
Tech Comm Technologies
Asychronous Online Samantha Clem he main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several technical communication courses.
Asychronous Online Rachel Bryson The main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several technical communication courses.
ENGL 3420 
Fiction Writing (CRWR)
Hybrid F2F
MW 1:30-2:45
Anne Stark Anne Stark’s Fiction Writing class (E3420) is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected.  Students generate stories, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, and look at published models from various subgenres of fiction, especially celebrating diverse voices. We execute methods of workshopping from established writing program protocol, designed to produce a more expansive second version of the story. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel. 

Blended Web Broadcast
MW 3:00-4:15
Nataile Rogers This blended broadcast course serves as an introduction to fiction writing and its capacity to inspire original thought and expression. It is meant to inspire your confidence as a writer and help you forge connections with other beginning writers in a supportive atmosphere. Through course readings, we will study contemporary fiction with a special focus on socially conscious narratives. How can we explore the complexity of human life in today’s world through writing? How can we use fiction to navigate complex social issues such as race, gender, and sexual identity? Why should we write? These questions will guide our discussion throughout the course. Most importantly, you’ll write your own stories and offer constructive feedback to your peers.

This is a blended web broadcast course. This means we’ll meet over Zoom and also complete coursework through discussion boards on Canvas. 

ENGL 3430
Poetry Writing (CRWR)
Web Broadcast
TR 9:00-10:15
Michael Sowder

English 3430 is an introductory poetry-writing workshop. Accordingly, much of the work of the semester will involve reading and responding to each other’s work in a rigorous yet supportive environment. Writing workshops were for me the most exciting and rewarding courses I took in college and grad school, and I hope this one will be as rewarding for you.  We will explore and experiment with writing many kinds of poetry, from video poems to spoken word poems, to formal poems on the page.

As you probably know, world literature began with poetry—deriving from religious ritual, magical spells, chants, and incantations. Other forms of creative writing—novels, fiction, and creative nonfiction—derived from poetry. Poetry employs the tools of creative writing in the most intense, compressed, and sophisticated ways possible. If you study the poetry of the last several millennia, you’ll sharpen and hone your writing in whatever genre you ultimately choose to write in. 

We’ll be using an excellent introductory book, Steven Kowit’s In the Palm of Your Hand, as well as three books of poetry by three of our own faculty members. We’ll watch an awesome film about poetry, and some videos, too. We will analyze poems, old and new, to see how they achieve their power, and we will learn from each other by workshopping poems in large and small group workshops. Students will write and revise ten new poems, including several poems in form. 

Grades will be based on a portfolio of poems turned in at the end of the semester and class participation. 

Web Broadcast
MW 1:30-2:45
Shanan Ballam

In this workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myths and fairy tales. We’ll complete a wide array of poetry exercises from Steve Kowit’s In the Palm of your Hand, ranging from cross-out/cut-up poems to poems about childhood memories, and we’ll read poetry collections by USU faculty members and poems from a diverse variety of voices. Students will write brief critical essays designed to illuminate specific aspects of poetic craft addressed in the readings and in class. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm! 

ENGL 3440
Creative Nonfiction Writing (CRWR) 
Web Broadcast
MWF 11:30-12:20
John Engler 4420 pic

Creative Nonfiction Writing is a class for people with something to say. Whether you have stories to tell from your life or you want to say something about Rihanna, racism, or raising cattle, we experiment with the tools of the nonfiction artist (like form, voice, and style) in a workshop-style supportive writing community to craft powerful memoir and personal essay. Whatever you have to say, this course gives you the chance to find a compelling way to say it.

 

Blended Web Broadcast
MWF 12:30- 1:20
 Ashley Wells


In this class, students will learn and explore techniques for developing successful creative nonfiction essays, particularly memoir and personal narrative. We’ll examine voice, vivid detail, narrative arc, active scenes, and observation through everything from traditional essays to graphic narratives to flash pieces. Together, we’ll look closely at compelling personal essays, analyze craft elements, engage in writing exercises, and workshop student essays with a focus on revision strategies.

ENGL 3460 
Rhetorical Theory
Asychronous Online  Erica Leigh Prepares students to analyze persuasive communication as it is enacted in a variety of texts and contexts. Students learn to define and understand rhetorical situations and theories and to evaluate rhetorical strategies. 
ENGL 3510
Teaching Young Adult Literature
 Asychronous Online  Joyce Kinkead  

English 3510 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Teaching degree program. This course combines literature with pedagogical theory and practice. In addition to reading a wide range of YAL that explores genres and issues, students will develop activities that they can use in their future secondary school classrooms.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3620
Native American Studies
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 1:30-2:45 
John Gamber  Theme: Contemporary issues, gender, and sexuality. We will focus on the ways Native American authors, auteurs, and thinkers portray modern issues in their communities. We will begin with a grounding in key concepts in Native American Studies and settler colonialism (including our own positionalities relative to colonialism), then move to artistic creations by and about Native American women and Two-Spirit people, with particular attention to colonial impositions heteropatriarchy in Indigenous communities and the (closely related) violence against Indigenous women and girls (#MMIWG).
ENGL 3630
Farm Literature (CI) (DHA)
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 1:30-2:45 
 Bonnie Moore  
The Literature and Culture of the Farm examines literature related to the farm, farming, and agriculture in the broad definition of the word, including written texts, images, music (folk song, farm ballads, and country), film, and material culture such as quilts. The course covers texts ranging from an ancient Sumerian almanac, Chaucer, Jefferson, Crevecoeur, Steinbeck, and Cather to more modern writers like Wendell Berry, Michael Pollan, Joel Salatin, Novella Carpenter, and Kristin Kimball. Students from a wide variety of majors including music, economics, business, education, communications, English, and engineering, as well as agricultural-related majors have found the course engaging, interesting, and valuable.
ENGL 3700
Topic: Folklore of the Middle East
Online (Statewide) Ehsan Estiri  

This course orients students to the folklore and folkloric practices of the Middle East. Material to be examined will be diverse across genres and drawn from various ethnic, national, and temporal spheres. Folklore is not necessarily ancient and historical, and there will be an emphasis on Middle Eastern contemporary life. In this course, folklore is conceptualized as everyday life expressive culture, including verbal arts, texts, performative activities, and material culture. Though this is not a theory course, students will gain an attenuated background in folklore studies that includes the history and development of the discipline, its various methods, and contemporary scholarly conversations.

ENGL 3710
Topic Folk: Legends, Rumors
 
Blended Web Broadcast
MWF 12:30-1:20
Lynne McNeill

In the Spring 2021 semester, this special topics course will focus on legend, belief, and conspiracy. This is an important topic for the current cultural moment, which is experiencing a growing awareness of the influence of folk culture on some of the most important structures of daily life, including politics, religion, and health. In this class we will consider the rhetorical nature of legends, the mechanics of conspiracy theories, the nature of belief, and the ways that narratives infuse our daily lived existence and influence our decision making.

Online (Statewide) Irina Mclaughlin  
ENGL 4200 Online (Statewide) Sonia Manuel-Dupont  

This is a 3-credit course that covers the following areas: morphology, phonology, syntax, child language acquisition, dialects, second language acquisition, world languages, and endangered languages.  It takes you through the process of what it takes to be a linguist and what linguists do.  From sub-Sahara Africa to the Navajo Nation, you learn how language makes a human being uniquely equipped to deal with the world around us. Assessment involves traditional exams, essays, and projects.  This is also a service learning class where you will create a language enhancement experience for a primary school in Uganda.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4230 
Language and Culture
Online (Statewide) John McLaughlin  An introduction to the use of language as a descriptive and analytical tool to understand human culture, and to how speakers use language to manipulate and shape their culture as a whole, including their individual place within it.  It looks at a range of topics through the lens of language as well as looking at the theoretical underpinnings of language as a mediator of culture.

ENGL 4300
Shakespeare
Blended Web Broadcast
MWF 11:30-12:20
Christine Cooper-Rompato In this class we will explore one of the most popular genres of Shakespearean drama, the comedy. These plays are not just about being funny and entertaining audiences—they question and challenge early modern social norms about gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will read and discuss five plays (The Tempest, The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, and Twelfth Night), watch video versions of the plays, and dive into the incredible Shakespeare podcast series offered by the Folger Shakespeare Library on topics such as Shakespeare’s life, early modern London, and the sights and sounds of the theatre. This class is a blended web broadcast, meaning that we will be meeting via zoom and also completing work online. We will meet for class zooms twice a week (Mondays and Wednesdays); Fridays will feature your online work, including watching my brief Friday lecture and listening to a podcast before posting on a small group discussion board. Students should expect to write three formal essays that are 4-5 pages in length as well as post and reply on weekly discussion prompts; students will also take comprehension quizzes that can be retaken if needed.

ENGL 4310
American Writers
Web Broadcast
TR 3:00-4:15
Natalie Aikens This eclectic course will strive to honor the literary giants of the Caribbean and the remembering, resistance, and resilience that their art encompasses.  The course will begin in the nineteenth-century with abolitionist drama by José Martí and Alejandro Tapia y Rivera, but the majority of the course will investigate the Postmodern Caribbean as written by some of today’s most celebrated contemporary US novelists including Cristina García, Edwidge Danticat, and Junot Díaz.  The last unit of the course will explore the way that remembering, resistance, and resilience sounds in the contemporary Caribbean, delving into the genre of reggaetón by listening to and reading the lyrics by artists such as Ivy Queen, Nesi, Residente, and Bad Bunny.  In addition to two papers, course assessments will include two creative projects: a scene adaptation of a nineteenth-century play we read and a podcast on reggaetón.

ENGL 4350
Studies in Poetry
F2F
TR 12:00-1:15
Paul Crumbley

This course focuses on the poetry of May Swenson, who graduated from Utah State in 1934 with a major in English, published eleven books of poetry and won multiple prizes and awards, including a MacArthur “genius grant” in 1987. Swenson was raised in Logan by Swedish converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and left Cache Valley in 1936 to make a life for herself as a poet in New York City. Though she grew up in a devout Latter-day Saints home, Swenson developed her own approach to religion and explored human sexuality as a lesbian poet. The class will give special attention to Swenson’s writing about poetic creation, her poems about the natural world, her love poems, and her poems exploring religion and spirituality. Members of the class will read Swenson’s poems, a brief biography, and a representative sampling of critical essays. Class members will write two research papers and participate in the Student Research Symposium.  

  Alan Blackstock

An analysis of the nature of the lyric: its form, structure, thematic content, and evolution. “Like all arts,” writes Helen Vendler in introducing her anthology Poems, Poets, Poetry, “lyric is meant to give pleasure—imaginative, linguistic, intellectual, and moral.  If one hasn’t enjoyed a poem and been moved by it, one hasn’t really experienced it as an artwork.  There are moments in life when one poem suits and another doesn’t…. Nonetheless, many of these poems have won and kept readers because in them readers have found the most moving revelation of all—that of their own inner life, enacted in words adequate to both sorrow and joy.”

ENGL 4360
Studies in Drama
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 10:30-11:45
Megan Snell

Despite the challenges of representing nature on stage, playwrights have long been fascinated by it. Nature may seem to be defined by its dichotomous opposition to civilization, but drama continually probes the intertwined relationship between humans and the environment. The “green world” of a play may offer characters a place with different expectations for behavior, instill a nostalgia that appears to clarify a sense of identity, or it may even be a place of danger and disaster, both for the characters and the environment. We will read plays that explore spiritual, aesthetic, and scientific conceptions of nature through dialogue, performance, and imagination. Our course will begin with Euripides’ The Bacchae and Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream before moving to modern and contemporary drama, including Sam Shepard’s True West, Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, Marina Carr’s By the Bog of Cats, Jez Butterworth’s Jerusalem, Yvette Nolan’s The Unplugging, Chantal Bilodeau’s Sila (The Arctic Cycle), and Lucy Kirkwood’s The Children.

ENGL 4375
US Latinx Literature
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 9:00-10:15
Christopher Gonzalez The US Latinx demographic comprises the largest non-majority group at nearly 20% of the nation’s population, and it continues to grow. Since the publication of José Villareal’s Pocho in 1959, Latinx literature has steadily flourished in the US. Though necessarily painted with the wide sweep of the Latinx literature brush, a study of relevant works demonstrates the diversity of historical ancestry, cultural contribution, and artistic mastery of Latinx authors, who are, let us not forget, American authors. This course is designed to present you with a wide range of literary works while providing you with analytical tools that will help your ability to appreciate, understand, and enjoy these masterworks of literature. We will explore multimodal narratives—specifically, novels, poetry, life writing, film, and comics. You do not need to have any prior study of US Latinx culture to take this course. 

ENGL 4400
Professional Editing
Asychronous Online  Erica Leigh

Students learn editing of technical and scientific documents; working with deadlines, levels of editing, and editing marks; working with groups of editors and clients; and revising document design. 

ENGL 4410
Document Design & Graphics
Blended Web Broadcast
MWF 10:30-11:20
Rebecca Walton


tcr This course will provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge about document design to   enable you to make and defend design decisions when creating documents for professional   contexts. You will learn about the human visual system and how the human body perceives   visual information. You will learn about interaction design, typography, color, and graphics.   You will apply your skills by designing portfolio-worthy documents to solve problems through   design. There is no required textbook for this class, but you will need access to screencasting   software, which is available for free in the RBW computer lab or online for less than $20. 

ENGL 4420
Adv. Fiction Writing (CI)
Blended Web Broadcast
MW 1:30-2:45
Natalie Rogers


In this advanced workshop, students will deepen their exploration of fiction writing and their unique identities as writers. To that end, while class time will focus on workshop of student work, we will also practice reading as a writer by examining innovative fiction from around the world, including works by Scholastique Mukasonga and Dorothy Tse. We will also study essays on writing by Claire Vaye Watkins, Alexander Chee, and Jess Row. Who are are our literary parents? How can we playfully contribute to and expand their visions of literature? How can we support the artistic growth of our peers and develop a supportive writing community? These questions will guide our workshop discussion throughout the semester.

This is a blended web broadcast course. This means we’ll meet over Zoom and also complete coursework through discussion boards on Canvas. 

ENGL 4430
Adv. Poetry Writing (CI)
Web Broadcast
TR 12:00-1:15
Michael Sowder

English 4430 is an advanced poetry-writing workshop. Accordingly, much of the work of the semester will involve reading and responding to each other’s work in a rigorous yet supportive environment. Writing workshops were for me the most exciting and rewarding courses I took in college and grad school, and I hope this one will be as rewarding for you.

As you probably know, world literature began with poetry—deriving from religious ritual, magical spells, chants, and incantations. Other forms of creative writing—novels, fiction, and creative nonfiction—derived from poetry. Poetry employs the tools of creative writing in the most intense, compressed, and sophisticated ways possible. If you study the poetry of the last several millennia, you’ll sharpen and hone your writing in whatever genre you ultimately choose to write in. 

In addition to weekly workshops, we’ll be reading several contemporary books of poetry including Sylvia Plath’s Ariel; Ted Hughes’s Birthday Letters; The Best American Poetry of 2020, edited by Utah’s Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal; Ross Gay’s exuberant A Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude; and Rupi Kaur’s The Sun and Her Flowers. These works will help us deepen our understanding of the diversity of styles and themes of contemporary poetry and help us see how it achieves its power. 

Grades will be based on a portfolio of poems turned in at the end of the semester and class participation. 

ENGL 4440
Adv. Nonfiction Writing (CI)
Web Broadcast
TR 1:30-2:45
Jennifer Sinor he advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the intro course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This semester we are considering the long form, a subgenre of creative nonfiction that is rooted in new journalism. Students will write two essays that are heavily steeped in research. The first essay will rely on the first person with the research working as a metaphor. The second essay will rely on the research for the story/tension with the first person providing example rather than narrative drive. This course will be especially appealing to those interested in narrative nonfiction, magazine writing, and research-based forms that tell stories but do not derive their stakes from the personal.

ENGL 4500
Teaching Writing
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 9:00-10:15
Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4500 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program.  This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices.  The learning activities and projects in this course will help members of the class collectively examine three related concepts:  designing, engaging, and assessing writing experiences.  Broadly, we will study the following questions:  What are meaningful aims for writers?  How do secondary writing teachers prompt students to engage in these purposes?  What kinds of support do students need to achieve these learning goals? Our course texts will support our investigation into these questions. Because the course is a web broadcast blended course, we will meet via Zoom every Thursday 9:00-10:15. Additional coursework will be completed asynchronously via Canvas.   

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 4520
Teaching Literacy-Diversity (CE)
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 12:00-1:15
aJessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4520 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. Students are required to also register for SCED 4300, the clinical experience that accompanies this course. Paired together, these courses provide an opportunity to peer deeply into classroom moments and learn about teaching and learning from a range of educational stakeholders, including secondary students, peers, mentor teachers, and scholars. Beyond reading about or practicing teaching tasks, these courses aim to help you help you develop a robust understanding of literacy from the perspective of a teacher in diverse classroom settings.  Collectively, we use our course reading and experiences in the clinical to examine classroom teachers’ roles as literacy educators. To that end, you will actively study scholarship related to teaching and learning, observe learners and learning communities, provide instructional support, deliver instruction, and reflect upon your process of becoming a teacher.  Engaging in each of these processes provides an opportunity to grapple with the connection between educational theory and practice. Because the course is a web broadcast blended course, we will meet via Zoom every Thursday 12:00-1:15. Additional coursework will be completed asynchronously via Canvas.   

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

Blended Amy Piotrowski

Admission to STEP and enrollment in SCED 4300 are required.  Public schools serve students who are diverse in many ways. All students are welcome in public schools regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or disability. This commitment to access for all kids is what makes public school public!  This course focuses on the diverse learners that public schools serve and how to differentiate literacy instruction to meet a range of learning needs.  Our goal is to become effective teachers for all students.  You will apply your learning by completing 30 hours in a classroom.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 4540
Teaching Creative Writing
Web Broadcast
TR 1:30-2:45 
Benjamin Gunsburg

“Teaching Creative Writing” will explore many aspects of designing and implementing multi-genre creative writing workshops at the middle school, high school, and community-education levels. The course will address the principles of good teaching and the principles of effective fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and dramatic writing. Students will gain experience writing poetry, fiction, and drama; planning lessons; developing tools for assessing student work; and choosing instructional materials.

ENGL 4630 
American Nature Writers
  Nathan Straight

This is not your granddad’s nature writing. The nature we will contemplate is filled with people (and other beings) and marked by the realities of environmental degradation and environmental injustice. The writers we will read use their imaginative powers to expand the possibilities of nature writing as they explore the legacies of our environmental attitudes and conjure possible futures of our own making. Often those futures are dystopian, and always they reflect the struggle for limited resources in worlds marked by inequity and power. They are beautiful, terrifying, strange, and vital reminders of the urgency and diversity of contemporary nature writing.

ENGL 4700/6760
Material Culture & Folk Art
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 12:00-1:15 
Afsane Rezaei

From quilting to cosplay, from roadside shrines to yard art and graffiti, folk art is all around us. This course explores various forms of everyday artistry as venues for individual and groups' creative expressions, while examining the relation of material objects with history, market, and cultural heritage. We will also address how different forms of folk art and material culture are intertwined with individual and collective expressions of gender, ethnic, and racial identities, as well as the role of folk art in politics, activism, and peace/conflict. The course draws on analytical approaches from folklore, anthropology, cultural studies, and other related fields. Lectures and discussions will be supplemented with films, (virtual!) field trips, and other activities. The course is cross-listed with ENG 6760, but will have different requirements for undergraduate students.

ENGL 5330 
Race and Ethnicity in Literature (CI)
Blended Web Broadcast
TR 3:00-4:15
Megan Snell This course will study representations of race, ethnicity, and American identity in modern drama and performance. Using the tools of literary analysis, students will explore theatre as a means to reflect on national mythologies and historic hierarchies of power, as well as personal relationships to one’s job, family, and home. We will read and watch plays that are interested in issues of inheritance, identity formation, the meaning and circumstances of work and housing, and questions of who tells what stories. Students will discuss and write about these plays not only as individual literary texts, but also as works in conversation with each other and other genres, as well as American culture, history, and politics. Authors will include Lorraine Hansberry, August Wilson, Sam Shepard, Suzan-Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Kristoffer Diaz, Lynn Nottage, and Lin-Manuel Miranda.

ENGL 5420
Project Mgmt in Tech Comm
Asynchronous Online Avery Edenfield

tcr The primary focus of this course is learning how to successfully manage   complex, self-directed writing projects. The technical communication field   increasingly requires writing professionals to be able to demonstrate skills in   collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, interpersonal communication, multi-   tasking, and teamwork. Even before the time of a global pandemic of COVID-19,
 projects often require writers to be adept at virtual collaboration and remote   work. In this asynchronous course, you will gain experience in these areas by   working remotely on a semester-long writing and research project. This course is
 intended to give students hands-on practice on a long project with multiple (graded) components. For Spring 2021, students will partner with prevention professionals from SAAVI and Title IX on projects related to the prevention of sexual misconduct at USU campuses in Logan and statewide. This course uses a free and open access textbook along with other freely available materials. For more information, email avery.edenfield@usu.edu 

 

ENGL 5430
Technical Communication Capstone 

Blended Web Broadcast
TR 1:30-2:45
Ryan Moeller

Students study how to successfully negotiate the job market in fields related to English, such as technical communication, user experience (UX), and publishing. Students learn how to professionalize; to develop successful job application materials such as a portfolio website, resumes, cover letters, and social media profiles; and to prepare for job interviews. 

ENGL 5450
Special Topics in Creative Writing
Web Broadcast
TR 10:30-11:45
Benjamin Gunsburg

English 5450 will explore writers’ efforts to shape and reflect our diverse and rapidly changing media textscape. We’ll investigate connections between different media forms and modes of representation, including film, music, electronic literature, and visual art. Students will have opportunities to create new media texts that combine audio, visual, and interactive elements. We’ll also examine and create work that exists in multiple forms, such as printed poems that also occur as audio files or videos in conversation with text-based material.

ENGL 5490
Writing with an Accent
Asynchronous Online John McLaughlin

Students study topics designed to enrich their understanding of technical communication and rhetoric. Topics, which vary by instructor, have included crisis communication, ethics and technology, marketing and public relations, and user experience design and testing. 



ENGL 5700 Online (Statewide) Lynne McNeill

This course introduces students to two of the major genres of folk narrative: folktales and legends. Commonly distinguished from each other by their complex relationships to truth and possibility, these narrative forms of folklore have been at the base of folkloristic study since the inception of the field, and theoretical approaches to them will take us from the history of the discipline to the cutting edge of contemporary folk narrative research. Other genres considered are memorate, creepypasta, and personal experience narrative, and we will also address embodied forms of narrative, such as ostension and legend-tripping.

       

Fall Semester 2020 Undergraduate Courses

Course

Instructor

Course Description

ENGL 1410   

Elements of Grammar

 Paige Smitten

Lezlie Branum-Christensen

 

ENGL 2070

Digital English Studies: Literature, Culture and Technology

TR 9:00-10:15

Dr. Ryan Moeller

English 2070 invites students to think about how digital media (“born-digital” texts like social media, streaming media, zines, video games, etc.) inform and influence their engagement with literature and culture in the present moment. At the same time, the course explores how digital media/culture helps us think critically about literature and media in the past and across different cultures by investigating the musical Hamilton and the novel Frankenstein. As we explore how these works have been remediated into digital formats, students will also explore how these works continue to engage with issues related to race, gender, sexuality, identity, family, individualism, science, technology, and transnationalism in the 21st century.

ENGL 2210

Introduction to Folklore

Dr. Lisa Gabbert

What is folklore? Why is it important? This course is a survey-level course that examines a variety of folklore genres across the globe. Topics include folktales of the Himalayas, European landscape legends, and Japanese monsters.  

ENGL 2600

Literary Analysis

Dr. Cooper-Rompato

Theme: "Peculiar Narrators." One of the most enjoyable, invigorating, and challenging aspects of analyzing literature is encountering narrators who insist on their own particular view of the world--even when we as readers know that view is strangely distorted. In this class we will encounter narrators in poetry and fiction who speak from a range of perspectives--including dead bodies and animals. Readings include 19th- and 20th-century poetry as well as novels by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler), Shirley Jackson, and Orhan Pamuk.

ENGL 2630

Survey of American Culture

Dr. Christopher Gonzalez

Watchmen

Theme: “Comics and Graphic Narratives.” This course will examine how comics have shaped American Culture since the Golden Age in around 1940 to the present through a variety of storytelling media. We will examine the impact of comics through a variety of forms, including novels (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay), graphic novels (Watchmen), comic strips (Nancy and Peanuts), various historical and analytical texts, documentary, television, and film.

ENGL 2640

Introduction to Ethnic Studies

Dr. John Gamber  Examines the ways that the concepts of race and ethnicity function in the contemporary US (in literature, film, television, digital media, music, and politics--to name a few) as well as the surprisingly recent history of the idea of race. 
ENGL 2720

American Folklore
Dr. Lisa Gabbert Survey of American Folklore. What is folklore? Why is it important? What can be learned about the US from its folklore? What are some of the similarities and differences between the folklore of the past and the folklore of the present? Find out how folklore has shaped responses to COVID-19! This course is a survey-level course that examines a variety of folklore genres. Topics include folktales, work songs, tall tales, legends, and American monsters. Examples are drawn from a variety of regional and ethnic groups.
 
ENGL 3210 

Classical Mythology
Susan Shapiro

"Myth" by c.a.francese is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 

ENGL 3315

Early Modern British Literary History
Dr. Megan Snell This course will study violation and its consequences in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century British literature. Students will contextualize portrayals of transgression within historical expectations of class, gender, sexuality, race, religion, and justice. We will also examine how authors explore these cultural violations by probing the boundaries of different literary forms in this period, such as the sonnet, the play, the epic poem, and the novella. Authors will include Wyatt, Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Middleton, Webster, Donne, Marvell, Milton, and Behn.
ENGL 3335

19th Century British Literature
Dr. Brian McCuskey This course investigates the uncanny appearance of ghosts, children, and ghostly children in British literature from William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience (1789) to Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw (1898).  The course concludes with a twisty turn to more contemporary American literature: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959) and Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987).
ENGL 3375 

American Literature Since 1900
Dr. Evelyn Funda

This course exemplifies how much literary history is written by rebels and innovators. As this course considers the periods of American Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism, we will discuss works where American literature addresses the purpose of art and whether writers can make art out of subjects such as industry, economics, politics, emerging technologies, sexuality, race, gender and class. Students will learn to do close literary analysis within historical contexts (for instance, we will read works relevant to our times that depict the flu pandemic of 1918).

ENGL 3400 

Writing for the Workplace / Professional Writing

Samantha Clem

Dr. Erica Leigh

This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

ENGL 3410

Digital Writing Technologies
Ryan Cheek The main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several courses such as ENGL 4400 Professional Editing, and it is a prerequisite for entering the technical communication and rhetoric emphasis.
ENGL 3420

Introduction to Fiction Writing


TR 1:30-2:45
Anne Stark

Anne Stark’s Fiction Writing class is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected.  Students generate stories, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, and look at published models from various subgenres of fiction, especially celebrating diverse voices. We execute methods of workshopping from established writing program protocol, designed to produce a more expansive second version of the story. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel.  

ENGL 3420

Introduction to Fiction Writing

MW 1:30-2:45
Dr. Natalie Rogers

In this introductory course, we will explore how socially conscious fiction addresses racism, sexism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression. To guide our discussion and creative writing, we will seek inspiration from writers who challenge social and literary conventions. We will examine works that employ realist, speculative, and comic devices in order to delve into the relationship between a work’s formal structure and its social critique. In what ways do these narratives challenge social norms, and in what ways do they reinforce them? How can we write about serious contemporary issues in inventive ways? What is the role of joy and play in these narratives? We will discuss technique and generate ideas for your creative work through in-class writing exercises. Each student will produce two pieces of fiction, a final revision, and written and oral commentary on peer work.

ENGL 3430

Poetry Writing


MW 1:30-2:45
Dr. Benjamin Gunsburg


This introductory poetry writing course is designed to help you become better writers and readers of poetry.  We’ll focus our attention on both free and formal verse, discussing student work as well as poetry written by established authors. Our efforts will revolve around craft, which means we’ll practice time-honored techniques that have strengthened poets’ efforts for thousands of years.  This approach begins with close attention to the language that moves us and, moreover, careful consideration of why it moves us.  In short, we’ll read well to write well.  And we will write—poems, craft exercises, reading responses, peer critiques, multimedia experiments. This writing will be supplemented by your efforts to develop a critical/literary vocabulary, one that broadens your understanding of published poetry and enlivens your responses to your classmates’ work.

ENGL 3430

Introduction to Poetry Writing


TR 10:30-11:45
Shanan Ballam

In this workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myths and fairy tales. We’ll complete a wide array of poetry exercises from Steve Kowit’s In the Palm of your Hand, ranging from cross-out/cut-up poems to poems about childhood memories, and we’ll read poetry collections by USU faculty members and poems from a diverse variety of voices. Students will write brief critical essays designed to illuminate specific aspects of poetic craft addressed in the readings and in class. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm! 

ENGL 3440

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

TR 1:30-2:45
Dr. Jennifer Sinor

In this course, we will be establishing the building blocks for creative nonfiction: scene, summary, musing, character, and dialogue. We will focus on autobiographical writing, specifically memoir or personal essay. Creative nonfiction always revolves around the “I,” even when the pronoun makes no appearance on the page, but in memoir and personal essay the “I” is what carries the piece—a thinking mind at work. As Scott Sanders writes, “I choose to write about my experience not because it is mine, but because it seems to open a door through which others might pass.”  Class time is primarily dedicated to full-class workshops with a portfolio of work due at the end of the semester.

ENGL 3440

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

TR 9:00-10:15 
Russ Beck

English 3440 will focus on crafting nonfiction. Few parameters will be placed on the subjects of the writing projects, but the class will emphasize narrative and personal writing. Assignment mediums will include traditional essays and experiments in new media. We will hone existing skills and work to create new ones through a mix of lectures, workshops and out-of-class assignments. 

ENGL 3450 

Workplace Research
Dr. Erica Leigh Technical communicators frequently engage in research to answer questions or address problems in the workplace. This course is designed to prepare you to work successfully as a technical writer by learning how to craft a research question; how to select appropriate methods to address a particular research question; how to ethically collect and analyze data; and how to report research findings and their associated implications (i.e., research-based recommendations). By partnering with a client for the full semester, you will practice applying all that you are learning within a real organizational context, learning about how you can conduct research to address real organizational problems and questions.
ENGL 3470

Research English Studies

MWF 10:30-11:20
Dr. Joyce Kinkead This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)
ENGL 3500

Teaching English

MW 3:00-4:15
Dr. Joyce Kinkead

Admission to STEP is required. The Teaching English course is paired with the one-credit course, SCED 3300 Clinical 1 (English) to provide students with hands-on experience working in secondary school classrooms. Students will meet in class and also work in schools 30 hours over the semester. The goal of the clinical experience is for pre-service teachers to begin to view the classroom and its students from the perspective of a teacher. Throughout your undergraduate education, you have focused on subject matter content; in this experience, you’ll be looking more closely at the process of teaching and learning. In particular, you’ll be observing how a teacher functions in the classroom as well as the teacher’s relationships with students, parents, colleagues, and school leaders. You will also have the opportunity to practice teaching in the classroom.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required); English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3500

Teaching English and Clinical Experience I English

M 5:15-7:45 (blended)
Dr. Amy Piotrowski
Admission to STEP is required. Teaching English is paired with the one-credit course, SCED 3300 Clinical 1, to provide students with hands-on experience working in secondary school classrooms. Students will meet in class and also work in schools 30 hours over the semester. The goal of the clinical experience is for pre-service teachers to begin to view the classroom and its students from the perspective of a teacher.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required); English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3510

Teaching Young Adult Literature

M 5:15-7:45 (blended)
Dr. Amy Piotrowski

Study of a variety of genres written specifically for adolescent audience. Intended for those interested in teaching secondary school English. This course will be a blended mix of in class participation and online content.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required); English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3610

Multicultural American Literature
Dr. Christopher Gonzalez

Theme: “Black Masculinities.” This course will examine how Black authors in the US within the last few years have engaged with narrative expressions of the black male body and black masculinities. Required readings will include The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle, The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead, The World Doesn’t Require You by Rion Amilcar Scott, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays by Damon Young, and The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

ENGL 3630

Farm Literature
Bonnie Moore  The Literature and Culture of the Farm examines literature related to the farm, farming, and agriculture in the broad definition of the word, including written texts, images, music (folk song, farm ballads, and country), film, and material culture such as quilts. The course covers texts ranging from an ancient Sumerian almanac, Chaucer, Jefferson, Crevecoeur, Steinbeck, and Cather to more modern writers like Wendell Berry, Michael Pollan, Joel Salatin, Novella Carpenter, and Kristin Kimball. Students from a wide variety of majors including music, economics, business, education, communications, English, and engineering, as well as agricultural-related majors have found the course engaging, interesting, and valuable.
ENGL 3710

Topics in Folklore
Dr. John McLaughlin The primary data of folklore is a text, either spoken or written.  As a text, it is subject to a wide variety of language tools that speakers have at their disposal in whatever language the original text is performed or recorded in.  This course will look at ways that English speakers can understand those tools and utilize them to gain a more subtle understanding of the texts that they encounter in other languages, whether in the original language or in English translation.  It will look at performance art and poetic art in the world's languages in addition to the history of writing and understanding how texts have been recorded through time.
ENGL 4210

History of the English Language: Change and Diversity Online

Dr. John McLaughlin

This course will examine the history of the English language from the earliest linguistically determined levels (Proto-Indo-European) up to the present day. It will include not just the nuts and bolts of how the sounds, grammar, and lexicon of the language changed, but also the sociolinguistic context of the role that the language played and how it was used during the run of its recorded history. This will include the rise of English as a modern global language and its role in the origins of pidgins and creoles around the world.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4300

Shakespeare
Dr. Megan Snell

This course will explore the purposes of playing within Shakespeare’s drama—including plays-within-plays and role playing—and the literary form of the play itself, now so inextricably linked to Shakespeare in literature and culture. Students will develop close reading, research, and writing skills to analyze and enjoy Shakespeare on the page, stage, and screen. Sampling from different early modern dramatic genres, we will read six Shakespeare plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Henry IV: Part 1, Hamlet, Macbeth, and The Tempest. Students will also be required to watch specific film or stage adaptations of each of these plays. This course will thus consider the literary and performance texts of Shakespeare both within their particular historical and cultural moments of production and as texts that continue to be reshaped and reinterpreted in productions across centuries.

ENGL 4310 

American Writers
Dr. Paul Crumbley This course will focus on the poetry and letters of Emily Dickinson. Students will read a concise biography and a sampling of current criticism, as well as selected letters and representative poems, but will concentrate primarily on the forty manuscript booklets Dickinson created as a form of self-publication. Class members will also participate in the fall Student Research Symposium organized by the Office of Research.

ENGL 4330

World Writers
Dr. John Gamber

Explores primarily contemporary film, digital media (including video games), and literature written by Indigenous people from multiple nations including Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, Japan, and Sweden.

ENGL 4340

Studies in Fiction: Love and Desire in Latinx Literature
Dr. Natalie Aikens Great works of literature involving love have often been thought to reify national ideals.  Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, for example, can be read as a plea for obedience from British subjects, solidifying the hierarchies of monarchy, aristocracy, and patriarchy.  Doris Sommer suggests in Foundational Fictions (1991) that many mid-nineteenth-century novels helped to articulate the ideals of fledgling nations in Latin America and unite disparate elements of the countries’ populations.

This course will examine the theme of love and desire in nineteenth- through twenty-first-century literature of the Americas by and centered on women.  “Love and Desire in Latinx Literature” will ask what it means for Latinx women to love and what kind of world female Latinx love creates.  The goals of the course will be two-fold: (1) to investigate the constitutive power of the love plot in women-centered narratives, and (2) to investigate the traits and parameters of the genre of fiction.  The short story, the novella, the serial comic, the novel, the graphic novel, and possibly two children’s books, will function as the playing field of our inquiry.  Authors may include Gertrudis Avellaneda, Maria Ruiz de Burton, Maria Cristina Mena, Isabel Allende, Cristina García, Rosario Ferré, Patricia Engel, Giannina Braschi, Jaime Hernandez, and Ernesto Quiñonez, Juan Felipe Herrera, Junot Díaz, and Gabby Rivera.

ENGL 4400

Professional Editing
Dr. Erica Leigh Whether or not your job title includes the word “editor,” you will find that good editing skills are an excellent way to move ahead in your workplace. A good professional/technical editor understands how language works, how others will likely expect it to be used, and how to craft it effectively—not just by copyediting and proofreading but also by editing comprehensively for content, organization, style, graphics, and document design. Most of your work in this course will be hands-on editing. By the end of the course, you should be able to do these things:

  • Evaluate documents’ editing needs and state specific editing priorities and objectives for the given rhetorical situation,
  • Copyedit and comprehensively edit documents written for a variety of audiences and/or clients, using both traditional copy marking and proofreading methods and electronic editing methods,
  • Assess the ethical, social, and technological implications of editing and act responsibly in light of these implications.
ENGL 4410 

Documents Design/Graphics
Dr. Rebecca Walton

This course will provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge about document design to enable you to make and defend design decisions when creating documents for professional contexts. You will learn about the human visual system and how the human body perceives visual information. You will learn about sketching, typography, color, and graphics. You will have multiple opportunities to apply your skills within complex, real-world contexts by working in teams to develop information products for actual clients. There is no required textbook for this class.

ENGL 4420

Advanced Fiction Writing: Novel Beginnings


TR 3:00-4:15
Amber Caron This upper-division class is designed for undergraduates who have already taken the Introduction to Fiction course and are interested in honing their craft by beginning a novel. In the first few weeks, we will study opening chapters of several novels to identify the strategies authors employ as they set the groundwork of a fictional world. How does a first chapter launch plot, introduce characters, and establish setting? How does an author make use of both acute and chronic tension? Where does the author choose to end the opening chapter, and what are the advantages of this choice? How does the first chapter teach us to read the rest of the novel? With answers to these and other craft-based questions, students will apply this new knowledge to their own first chapter. Workshops will help students revise and polish their work, and readings and lectures will help them plan next steps.

(Please note: while our principal concern will be the novel, students whose primary interest is short fiction are also welcome in this workshop, as many first novel chapters are often published as stand-alone short stories.)  

ENGL 4430 

Advanced Poetry Writing


MW 1:30-2:45
Dr. Michael Sowder ENGL 4430, Writing the Narrative Poem, will an advanced poetry-writing workshop devoted to writing narrative poems, poems that tell stories.  Barrowing many devices from fiction writing—in fact, fiction borrowed them from poetry, since narrative poetry preceded prose fiction—think of Homer, Dante, the Bhagavad Gita)—we will focus on things like plot, foreshadowing, character development, dialogue, point of view, scene description, in addition to the usual tools of poetry— sound, rhythm, rhyme, metaphor, concision, the image, voice, diction, etc.  We will be reading wonderful books of narrative poetry: Ross Gay’s Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude; Oceanic by Aimee Nezhukumatathil; Sky Ward by Ali, Kazim; Welcome Dangerous Life, by Ben Gunsberg; and The Animal Inside, by Shanan Ballam. This will be an exciting semester!
ENGL 4440

Advanced Nonfiction Writing


TR 3:00-4:15
Dr. Jennifer Sinor The advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the intro course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This semester we are considering the long form, a subgenre of creative nonfiction that is rooted in new journalism. Students will write two essays that are heavily steeped in research. The first essay will rely on the first person with the research working as a metaphor. The second essay will rely on the research for the story/tension with the first person providing example rather than narrative drive. This course will be especially appealing to those interested in narrative nonfiction, magazine writing, and research-based forms that tell stories but do not derive their stakes from the personal.
ENGL 4510 

Teaching Literature

MWF 11:30-12:20
Dr. Benjamin Gunsberg

English 4510 prepares students to teach literature, including print literature, film, television, and print journalism. The course explores a variety of pedagogical strategies for teaching diverse literary traditions to students of various backgrounds and developmental levels. Students will engage both the philosophical and practical dimensions of secondary English teaching by reflecting on readings, designing units, and delivering instruction to one another. Woven into this course will be opportunities for regular writing, examination of digital resources, and sustained work on a piece of literature that is of special interest to each student. Students will build a library of digital and print-based professional resources that will support their efforts within and beyond this course. Engaging the complexities of lesson planning and assessment, students will create a unit centered on a literary text(s) of their choosing. 

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520 

Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms/Clinical Experience II English

M 4:00-7:00
Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont

 Admission to STEP required. Schools serve an increasing number of students who come from diverse backgrounds. Such diversity suggests that one-size-fits-all curriculum and instruction will not serve the varied literacy learning needs of students. This course, designed for students in the English Teaching emphasis, will focus on meeting the needs of all learners. You will learn to differentiate lessons for the students in contemporary secondary English classrooms. You must register for both ENGL 4520 and SCED 4300 in the same semester.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)/ English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 5300

Special Topics in Literature: The Voice! Truth-telling in Testimonial Literature


Dr. Natalie Aikens NBC’s The Voice has since April of 2011 highlighted American talents that may have previously escaped the notice of the country’s talent scouts and recording studios.  The show has brought to light (and center stage) the voices of those that would likely otherwise be unheard by such a broad, national audience.  Testimonial literature functions in a similar way to illuminate the singular voices of marginalized peoples often catapulting stories and people to (inter)national limelight.

The testimonio has long been an important genre in Latin American literature.  George Yúdice defined the testimonio in 1985 as a text which represents an “exorcising and setting aright official history.”  Testimonial literature, however, is not unique to Latin America; in fact, testimonial literature plays a critical role in what we today call American Literature, a set of texts that encompasses writing and orature by Native Americans, Europeans colonizing the Americas, African Americans, Asian Americans, the Latinx populace, and increasingly women.  This course will ask the question in a post-#MeToo world of what it means to testify, to bear witness to a particular experience or event in literature of the Americas.  The texts in this course will represent not only a broad geographical, but also a broad temporal sphere ranging from the sixteenth-century histories of Father Bartolomé de las Casas to the nineteenth-century writings of Mary Prince, Juan Francisco Manzano, Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, and the twentieth- and twenty-first-century writings of Rigoberta Menchú, Toni Morrison, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Díaz, Isabel Allende, and Claudia Rankine.

ENGL 5400

Technology and Activism


Dr. Avery Edenfield

In this topics course, students examine the role of ethics and social justice in technical communication, learning to connect theory and heuristics with applied expertise and decision making. Drawing on rhetorical, cultural, and critical theories, this class interrogates the intersection of gender, rhetoric, and technology, specifically as they relate to technical communication as a field and as a profession. Students will explore this territory through a range of technical communication topics including aesthetics and design, UX, (dis)ability, and embodiment. This class will explore these topics with an intersectional lens regarding race, class, and sexuality.

Related to the intersections of gender, rhetoric, and technology, students will:  

  • Learn to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view
  • Learn to apply coursematerial (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)
  • Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course

In addition to completing regular reflections on the assigned reading, students will conduct research and write papers. There is no required textbook for this class.

ENGL 5430

Technical Communications Capstone

Dr. Ryan Moeller This course is designed to prepare you to successfully negotiate the job market after graduating with a degree in English studies. While the course was designed as a required capstone experience for students in the Professional and Technical Writing emphasis of the major, all students can benefit from a sustained and critical look at their professional identity materials. You will learn how to professionalize and present your experiences as a student/worker/intern to potential employers and to develop successful job materials, such as a portfolio website, resume, cover letter, social media presence, interviewing strategies, and more! 
ENGL 5450

Special Topics In Creative Writing: Writing the Sacred


MW 3:00-4:15
Dr. Michael Sowder

How does sacred writing—scripture, poetry, prophesy—achieve its power on the page?  In ancient texts like the upaniśads, the Heart Sutra, the Psalms, the Tao Te Ching, to modern texts like Emerson’s essays, Emily Dickinson’s, Anne Waldman’s or Mary Oliver’s poetry, to M.L. King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” poets and writers have sought to charge language with power, awe, uplift, sublimity.  How do they achieve such power in language? In this creative-writing class we will study the rhetorical, linguistic, and poetic devices that poets and writers have used to write sacred, inspired texts.  We will then attempt to write sacred, inspired texts of our own.   

ENGL 5490

Topics in Technical Communications & Rhetoric


Dr. Keith Grant-Davie

Effective crisis communication can help an organization before, during, and after a crisis. Internal crisis communication manages members of the organization as they respond to a crisis while external crisis communication addresses the media and publics in order to ensure safety, represent the situation accurately, guide public action, and preserve goodwill. This course will prepare you to work on a team that shapes an organization’s crisis communication policies. You will learn to do these things:

  • Assess an organization’s likely risks—both within and beyond its control—that could lead to crises.
  • Use communication to help an organization both to avoid crises and to prepare for them.
  • Identify an organization’s publics—the audiences it will need to address in a crisis.
  • Create a communication plan for an organization to respond to its most likely crises.
  • Select and prepare spokespeople to address the media and public in a crisis.
  • Use both traditional and social media in crisis communication.

Required text: Fink, S. (2013). Crisis communications: The definitive guide to managing the message. ISBN: 978-0071799218. (Also available in Kindle format.)

 

Spring Semester 2020 Undergraduate Courses


Course     

Instructor  

Course Description 

ENGL 2210
(HIST/ANTH)

Introduction to Folklore

Dr. Eric Morales

Children’s handclapping and jump rope games, late nights dancing salsa or bachata, and graffiti found under bridges and train cars are all examples of the vibrancy of folklore. It lives in the games we play, our entertainment, and in our response to tragedy. More than anything, though, folklore is how we use creativity in our everyday lives to make sense of the world. 

This course will study how different cultural forms help express, negotiate, transform, and maintain communities. We will center our discussions on five main areas of inquiry: Material Culture, Literary Folklore, Performance, Spirituality, and Festivals, which will enable us to explore everything from vibrant salsa dance scenes in the Bronx to hidden rituals of Santeria. Throughout the semester, we will problematize issues of migration, masculinity and femininity, sexuality, nationalism, spirituality, and identity. We will discuss different theories of folklore, critically consider the historical development of folkloristics, and examine how its methodologies and theories help us understand any and all ethnic groups. 

ENGL 2220

Introduction to Fiction

Dr. Brian McCuskey

This general education course encourages students not only to read fiction more closely but also to consider a deep question: why do we humans read fiction at all?  How does fiction help us to reflect upon our past, present, and future?  The syllabus includes: George Saunders, Tenth of December; William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower; and Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake.

GEN ED: BHU

ENGL 2600

Literary Analysis
Dr. Natalie Rogers In this course, students will analyze the three major genres of literature—poetry, drama, and prose narrative. Students will learn how to compose an effective literary argument, offer effective textual support, and articulate their ideas in an academic setting. We will read works by Jesmyn Ward, Tom Stoppard, and Claudia Rankine. 
All English Majors: Recquired Core Lit

ENGL 2600

Literary Analysis
Dr. Brian McCuskey This course teaches English majors to develop complex arguments about literary texts and to write literary criticism. The course emphasizes practice: how to read a text closely, how to marshal textual evidence, how to develop an idea, and how to organize an argument. We will analyze the relationship between language, form, and theme in the four major genres of literature: poetry, prose fiction, nonfiction prose, and drama.
All English Majors: Recquired Core Lit

ENGL 2630

Survey of American Culture

Susan Andersen This class encourages you to combine, cross, and stretch conventional boundaries as you study the diversity and complexity of American culture through the lens of “The Year of the Woman.” You will find fun and challenge as you examine the work of culture through literature, film, television, music, art, history, politics, and more: From Laura Esquivel’s Like Water For Chocolate to Tara Westover’s bestselling memoir Educated; from the 1930 short film Triflesto contemporary blockbuster Lady Bird; from Susan B. Anthony to SCOTUS’s RBG; from June Cleaver to Wonder Woman, you will explore the intersection of women and American culture in all its complexities.

ENGL 3040

Perspectives in Writing and Rhetoric
Dr. Joyce Kinkead

How and why did writing develop? This course addresses the fascinating history of writing across time and place, beginning several thousand years ago with the origins of writing and moving to contemporary perspectives, including social media. We will look at the development of various writing technologies, such as pens, pencils, the printing press, and keyboards. We will engage in hands-on activities, such as making paper, cutting a quill pen, and making letter locks as Queen Elizabeth I did to keep her correspondence private from spies. Reading materials provided.

Requirements filled: DHA

ENGL 3325

18th-Century British Literary History: Courtship, Contracts, Consent—Marriage and Its Discontents
Dr. Mattie Burkert This course will examine debates about marriage in literature of the long eighteenth century, which extended from about 1660 to the turn of the nineteenth century. Together, we will consider how writers of this period represented marriage in poems, plays, fiction, and visual culture, and how they contributed to the development of the marriage plot we still recognize today. As we will see, these texts do far more than consider the pleasures and perils of finding a spouse; they also raise pressing questions about gender and sexuality, power and its abuse, economics and social class, political subjectivity, religion, and law. Course texts will include stage comedies by Aphra Behn, William Congreve, and Susanna Centlivre; philosophical writings by John Locke; and mock-epic poetry by Alexander Pope. In the second half of the semester, we will turn to the novel—a relatively new form in this period—examining Samuel Richardson's smash hit Pamela and two parodies it inspired: Henry Fielding’s Shamela and Eliza Haywood’s Anti-Pamela. We will conclude with Jane Austen's quintessential novel of manners, Pride and Prejudice, which is sometimes read as a rewriting of Pamela. In addition to producing traditional literary analyses, students will use library databases to conduct and present original research on a topic of their choice.  Note: Some readings will address issues of sexual harassment and assault.
Creative Writing: Lit History
Literature: Lit History-British
Teaching: Lit History

ENGL 3345
Literary History of the British Isles since 1900

Dr. Kristine Miller This course teaches English majors to read closely and to develop arguments about literature in relation to literary and cultural history. The course traces British literary history from the First World War into the twenty-first century. We will read, discuss, and write about the relationship between content and context in four genres of modern British literature: poetry, fiction, nonfiction (historical documents and writing by the authors we read), and drama.
Creative Writing: Lit History
Literature: Lit History-British
Teaching: Lit History

ENGL 3355

Literary History of the Early Americas
Dr. Keri Holt This course examines the literature of the early Americas from the Spanish conquest through the founding of the United States. The concepts of "literature" and "America" changed a great deal during this time, and we will explore how writing shaped understandings of culture, nation, and identity in North and South America. We will study a range of genres, including pictography, letters, essays, exploration narratives, captivity accounts, legends, poems, autobiographies, and novels. We will also focus on reading works in conjunction with their historical contexts such as the Enlightenment, the Salem Witch Trials, the American Revolution, and more, working closely with primary and secondary sources to develop your research and critical analysis skills.
Creative Writing: Lit History
Literature: Lit History-American
Teaching: Lit History-American

ENGL 3395

World Literature in Translation: Medieval Italy, Wales, and Mali
Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato In this class we’ll read some of the world’s most famous literature—although most students in the U.S. probably haven’t heard of many of these texts! We’ll read epics, romances, and other genres in English translation from three different countries and language traditions—Wales, Italy, and Mali. Explore the hero’s journey in the Sunjata, Arthur’s adventures in the Mabinogian, Dante’s trip to hell in the Inferno, the naughty and not-so-naughty tales of the Decameron, the surprising poetry of Gwerful Mechain, as well as the history of kings from Mali from the Tarikh-es Soudan. All readings in modern English.
Creative Writing: Lit History
Literature: Lit History-World
Teaching: Lit History-World
ENGL 3400
Professional Writing
 Samantha Clem Students are introduced to professional workplace writing, transitioning from writing for academic audiences to writing workplace documents. Students design and write professional documents, synthesize and evaluate arguments on technology and society, and collaborate in teams to present technical information.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Tech Comm: Required Intro
ENGL 3410
Professional Writing Technology
 Dr. Ryan Moeller Teaches students how to teach themselves writing technologies used by professional communicators, including photo manipulation software, advanced document design software, basic HTML and CSS, and screencasting tools.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Tech Comm: Required Intro
ENGL 3420
Introduction to Fiction Writing
 Dr. Charles Waugh This introduction to fiction writing course will help you see all the many things a story is besides what happens. Plot may be “the soul of a tragedy,” according to Aristotle, but it certainly won’t keep your readers if that’s all there is. We will examine why character matters, as well as imagery, description, setting, time, point of view, and sparkling prose, among many other things. By taking this course, you will learn: 1) to use a basic fiction writing vocabulary, 2) to identify the core narratological concepts in a work of fiction, 3) to recognize the sound and rhythm of good prose, 4) to understand and employ various narrative structures, and 5) to participate fully and constructively in a workshop oriented class. The success of this workshop depends on your commitment to your writing community, your careful reading of your peers’ work, and your ability to offer sincere, constructive criticism.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro
ENGL 3420
Introduction to Fiction Writing
 Anne Stark Anne Stark’s Fiction Writing class (E3420) is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. The class functions as a community, each supporting the other in creating original prose, while understanding the importance of the reader in the writing process.  Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected.  We generate stories, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, and look at published models from various subgenres of fiction, especially celebrating diverse voices. We execute methods of workshopping designed to produce a more expansive second version of the story. These methods come from established writing program protocol. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3430

Introduction to Poetry Writing
Shanan Ballam In this workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myths and fairy tales. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm! 
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3430

Introduction to Poetry Writing

 Jason Olsen This course is open to writers at all levels and will introduce basic concepts of poetry in an engaging and accessible fashion. In this hybrid course, we will be reading contemporary poetry and writing extensively, both in a workshop environment and through writing prompts. A student will leave this course with greater appreciation for and skill in poetry. 
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3430

Introduction to Poetry Writing
Dr. Michael Sowder English 3430 is an introductory poetry-writing workshop. In this class we will explore and experiment with writing many kinds of poetry, from video poems to spoken word peoms, to formal poems on the page. We’ll be using an excellent introductory book, Steven Kowit’s In the Palm of Your Hand, as well as two books by two of our own faculty members. We’ll watch an awesome film about poetry, and videos, too. We will analyze poems, old and new, to see how they achieve their power, and we will learn from each other by workshopping poems in large and small group workshops. Students will write and revise ten new poems, including several poems in form.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3440

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing
Paige Smitten This is a demanding reading and writing course in which students will analyze several nonfiction writing strategies as well as create their own pieces.  We will examine various types of creative nonfiction such as memoir, personal essay, nature, and brevity pieces.  These pieces will serve as composition-style models on which students can base their own pieces of writing. Students will also learn the vocabulary and craft tools used in the genre.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3440

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing
Robb Kunz The semester will be broken into two sections: the study of creative nonfiction techniques and the crafting of original creative pieces. Students will study/read a wide variety of essays, flash, mixed-media, and illustrative/graphic examples from writers across the creative nonfiction genre. Students will then be asked to mimic form and style from specific writers while incorporating their personal experience and memories. Towards the end of the semester, students will craft an “essay,” in the form of their choice, to workshop with the entire class. Workshop will attempt to teach students how to share their work in a large group setting while communicating constructive impressions/ideas to their peers.
All English Majors: Core Writing
Creative Writing: Required Intro

ENGL 3450

Methods and Research in Technical Communication
Rachel Bryson Teaches students to conduct research using methods employed by professionals in the workplace. Students learn to work in teams, collect and analyze data, and make research-based recommendations to solve organizational problems.
Tech Comm: Required Theory

ENGL 3470

Approaches to Research in English Studies
Dr. Joyce Kinkead

This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3510

Teaching Young Adult Literature
Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller English 3510 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices. Through the process of reading and discussing a wide range of diverse young adult literature, we will explore central trends and issues in the field of Young Adult Literature and a variety of ways of interpreting, analyzing, and teaching YA Lit. Throughout all of our work together, we will look to theories and research about reading, literature, and teaching in order to contextualize, understand, and problematize our own theories and experiences. This course, then, will ultimately help you understand who you hope to become as a literature teacher and participate in our profession’s conversations about the teaching of YA Lit.
Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3620

Native American Studies
Dr. John Gamber An introduction to a number of the key issues and debates of within Native American Studies. Students will come away with a working knowledge of many of the most pressing issues pertaining to Native American people and communities today. These studies will engage in a host of approaches ranging from law, critical theory, history, gender and sexuality studies, critical race studies, anthropology, literature, art, film, television, and music.
All English Majors: Core Culture 
Creative Writing: Lit History 

Literature: Lit History-American
Teaching: Lit History-American

ENGL 3630

The Farm in Literature and Culture

Bonnie Moore This course examines literature related to the farm, farming, and agriculture in the broad definition of these words, including written texts, images (paintings, posters, billboards and ads), music (folk song, farm ballads, and country), film (documentaries and Hollywood), and material culture such as quilts and barn hex stars.  We cover texts ranging from an ancient Sumerian almanac and Chaucer, to Jefferson and Crevecoeur, Steinbeck and Cather, to more modern writers like Wendell Berry, Michael Pollan, Novella Carpenter, and Kristin Kimball. Students from a wide variety of majors including music, economics, business, education, communications, English, and engineering, as well as agricultural-related majors find the course engaging, interesting, and valuable.
ENGL 3710

Topics in Folklore: Food and Culture Studies
Dr. Eric Morales

Food is a basic human need, but it is also a powerful symbol of social and cultural meaning. Every meal we eat is a product of thousands of years of generational knowledge that went into cultivating plants, raising or hunting meat, and preparing dishes. Yet, what do our personal decisions around food tell us about our identities? To put it a different way, why wouldn’t you add mustard to fry sauce?

Through interdisciplinary readings, lectures, films, cooking demonstrations, and class discussions, this course will examine the relationship between food, culture, and identity. Using cross-cultural perspectives, we will explore food at every level, from production to consumption, analyzing how food access and quality affects communities. We will also interrogate and problematize food in terms of power, sustainability, religion, nationalism, globalization, and, of course, how that impacts our personal tastes.

ENGL 4200

Linguistic Structures

[online]
Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont This is a 3-credit course that covers the following areas: morphology, phonology, syntax, child language acquisition, dialects, second language acquisition, world languages, and endangered languages. It takes you through the process of what it takes to be a linguist and what linguists do.  From sub-Saharan Africa to the Navajo Nation, you learn how language makes a human being uniquely equipped to deal with the world around us. Assessment involves traditional exams, essays, and projects.  This is also a service learning class where you will create a language enhancement experience for a primary school in Uganda.
Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)
ENGL 4210
History of the English Language
Dr. John McLaughlin This course will examine the history of the English language from the earliest linguistically determined levels (Proto-Indo-European) up to the present day. It will include not just the nuts and bolts of how the sounds, grammar, and lexicon of the language changed, but also the sociolinguistic context of the role that the language played and how it was used during the run of its recorded history. This will include the rise of English as a modern global language and its role in the origins of pidgins and creoles around the world.
Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)
ENGL 4230
Language and Culture
Dr. John McLaughlin An introduction to the use of language as a descriptive and analytical tool to understand human culture, and to how speakers use language to manipulate and shape their culture as a whole, including their individual place within it.  It looks at a range of topics through the lens of language as well as looking at the theoretical underpinnings of language as a mediator of culture.
ENGL 4300
Shakespeare: Magic and Medicine
Dr. Phebe Jensen The plays of Shakespeare will be explored in the context of early modern ideas about nature, magic, medicine, and science.  The purpose of this course is to help students 1) begin or continue a life-long process of enjoying Shakespeare’s plays; 2) explore the theatrical and cultural contexts that originally informed Shakespeare’s plays; and 3) understand Shakespeare’s plays as living texts that have been and continue to be reinterpreted.  Students will gain a broader understanding of both Shakespeare’s work and modern reinterpretations as they learn factual knowledge about Shakespeare’s world, the early modern theater, and the genre of drama.  This section of English 4300 will focus particularly on early modern ideas about medicine and magic, reading The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, All’s Well that End’s Well, The Tempest, and Macbeth.
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Authors- British
Teaching: Required
ENGL 4300
Shakespeare: Outsiders, Outcasts, Misfits—Community and Identity in Shakespeare’s Plays
Dr. Mattie Burkert This course considers Shakespeare’s works both as products of a specific time and place—early modern England—and as living texts that continue to hold immense cultural power around the world. The poems and plays we will read in this class raise questions about identity and community that still resonate today: What does it mean to be “normal”? What parts of a person are intrinsic to that individual’s being, and what parts are shaped by their upbringing and surroundings? How should a society treat differences? Who gets to decide who’s in and who’s out, and on what basis? We will look at how Shakespeare represents issues of ability, class, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, and sexuality in selected sonnets and in six plays: A Midsummer Night’s DreamTwelfth NightThe Merchant of VeniceRichard IIIOthello, and The Tempest. As a class, we will study historical contexts in order to understand how Shakespeare’s engagement with these issues fits into the larger social and cultural landscape of his moment. At the same time, we will consider the plays’ enduring legacy on film and stage. In order to help us appreciate these works as performance texts, we will have the opportunity to interact with a visiting theater troupe, the Actors from the London Stage. We will also study film adaptations of the plays, some of which may carry an “R” rating, and all of which have been selected for their intellectual and artistic value. 
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Authors- British
Teaching: Required
ENGL 4320
British Writers: Chaucer and Kempe, The End of the Middle Ages
Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato What did the end of the Middle Ages look like in England? What did medieval people love, hate, and fear? In this course we’ll meet two incredibly important medieval English authors—Geoffrey Chaucer and Margery Kempe. Whereas Chaucer is well known as “The Father of the English language,” Kempe was virtually forgotten until the 20th century. Both authors are deep thinkers tackling a range of subjects from religious reform to sex—Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales and Margery Kempe in her autobiography.  Readings will be in modern and Middle English.
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Authors- British
Teaching: 4000+ Lit

ENGL 4330

World Writers: Global Indigenous Literature
Dr. John Gamber Explores primarily contemporary literature (broadly defined and including graphic texts and film) written by Indigenous people from nations including Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, Japan, Mexico, and Sweden.
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Authors- World
Teaching: 4000+ Lit

ENGL 4340

Studies in Fiction: American Gothic Literature
Dr. Keri Holt This course examines American gothic fiction. Supernatural, spooky, dark, murderous, gory, graphic, unnerving, eerie, American gothic fiction defies and affirms cultural conventions, and expectations, and we’ll talk about the role gothic fiction plays in shaping our perceptions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and national politics. We will read a wide range of American gothic works, focusing on novels and stories published in the 19th-21st centuries, including works by Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Chesnutt, Shirley Jackson, and Stephen Graham Jones, among others.
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Genres
Teaching: 4000+ Lit

ENGL 4345

Studies in Nonfiction Prose: Grief Writing
Dr. Jennifer Sinor Memoirist Meghan O’Rourke says we write about loss to help us navigate “bewildering change in an age that’s largely let go of the ceremonies that helped bridge the stark boundary between inner sorrow and outer functioning.” Writing becomes a ritual, a rite. Too often we confine grief to the loss of a loved one. While this loss is profound and alters our understanding of ourselves and our world, it is not the only loss we experience in our lives. We grieve every day—we grieve our bodies, we grieve our minds, we grieve the land under our feet, we grieve a world that might not accept our sexuality, culture, or past. Sometimes the grief is extraordinary—genocide—and sometimes the grief is more ordinary—a knee that no longer bends like it used to.  In this class, we will look at artists who turn to writing to express loss: Jose Orduna, Terese Marie Mailhot, Kate Zambreno, Mark Doty, Roxane Gay, Gerda Saunders, Clemantine Wamariya, and others. As Joyce Carol Oates points out, grief is unlike any other emotion that we experience; it is entirely unreciprocated. What has been lost can no longer converse. Grief writing enacts that one-sided conversation on the page—and maybe, in that way, allows the writer, as Oates says, to “lose the white-hot flame of the most intransigent grief, and pass into another, less desperate sort of being.”
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Genres
Teaching: 4000+ Lit

ENGL 4360

Studies in Drama: Theatre, Town, and City, 1568-1624
Dr. Phebe Jensen This course will study material culture, urban life, and theatre by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in early modern London. In this course students will learn about life in early modern London, its suburbs, and surrounding towns, then use that knowledge concerning work, food and dining, clothing, education, gender relationships, crime and punishment, neighborhoods, political power structures, and the newly established theatre industry, to analyze six early modern plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries: The Shoemaker’s Holiday, The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Arden of Faversham, The Roaring Girl, Merry Wives of Windsor, and Bartholomew Fair. 
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Genres
Teaching: 4000+ Lit

ENGL 4400

Professional Editing
Dr. Keith Grant-Davie

As a technical communicator, you will need editing skills in the workplace. You will need to know how language works and how to make it work for you. This course aims to help you achieve these skills for professional and technical materials. Most of your work in this course will be hands-on editing to give you the necessary knowledge and practice to succeed as a technical writer or editor. By the end of the course, you should be able to do the following:

  •   Recognize and use conventional copymarking symbols and notations.
  •   Understand the differences between copyediting, proofreading, and comprehensive editing.
  •   Copyedit documents for correctness, consistency, accuracy, and completeness.
  •   Comprehensively edit documents to improve their organization and content, graphics, and document design.
  •   Evaluate documents’ editing needs and state specific editing objectives.
  •   Edit documents written for a variety of audiences and/or clients using both traditional and electronic editing methods.
  •   Consider the ethical, social, and technological implications of editing and act responsibly in light of these implications.
Requirements filled: CI (Communication Intensive)
Tech Comm: TCR Major Course

ENGL 4420

Advanced Fiction Writing
Dr. Charles Waugh The purpose of this advanced fiction writing course is to allow you to make the step from story dabbler to serious fiction writer, and to help you, as M.S. Bell says, “deploy unconsciously, intuitively, instinctively” the rudimentary skills you learned in the introductory course.  The readings of our own work will be the basis for our workshop discussions, which means you must read the work in advance and come to class prepared with notes to help you give thoughtful, constructive criticism. We will also read exemplary texts to help us better understand what creates good writing, to train ourselves always to read as a writer, and to find how a particular word or sentence contributes to the overall effect. The success of the workshop will depend entirely on your own inventiveness, your complete engagement and full participation, and your abilities to recognize the narratological nuts and bolts of a story, to not be swept along by plot, to be critical but supportive, and to remember that the text is being critiqued, not the author.

ENGL 4430

Advanced Poetry Writing
Dr. Michael Sowder English 4430 is an advanced poetry-writing workshop. This semester, 4430 will be devoted to writing formal poems: sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, paradelles, sestinas, limericks, ballads, blank verse! You will learn the nuts and bolts of poetry scansion. You’ll understand how all those old poems were really put together!  Many free verse poets started as formalists, and practicing writing formal poems will make you a better poet, no matter what style you ultimately write in!  We’ll be using an excellent introductory book, Paul Fussel’s, Poetic Meter, Poetic Form, along with The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms, by Mark Strand and Eavan Boland.  We will also learn from each other by workshopping poems in large and small workshops. Students will write and revise ten new poems, all in form!  This will be an exciting semester!

ENGL 4340

Advanced Creative Nonfiction

Dr. Jennifer Sinor In this advanced creative nonfiction workshop, we will be exploring the lyric essay. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with form as they explode the narrative line in favor of association and metaphor. Sitting on the borderlands between prose and poetry, the lyric essay demands an active reader and revels in the delights of ambiguity. After reading a number of lyric pieces, we will write several lyric essays and workshop them

ENGL 4500

Teaching Writing
Dr. Ben Gunsberg English 4500 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. This course will help you chart your own path to becoming a successful English teacher by providing readings, activities, and assignments that address the practical, psychological, and philosophical dimensions of writing instruction. Woven into this course will be opportunities for regular writing, examination of digital resources, practice teaching, and sustained work on a writing-based unit centered on a topic of special interest to you. Broadly, we will study the following questions: What are meaningful aims for writers? How do secondary writing teachers prompt students to engage in these purposes? What kinds of support do students need to achieve these learning goals? We will undoubtedly raise many more questions, and I do not presume that we will arrive at a settled view of the topics under consideration, but we will certainly develop more nuanced understandings of the teaching of writing.
Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)
ENGL 4510
Teaching Literature
Dr. Amy Piotrowski English 4510 prepares students to teach literature, broadly defined to include canonical, contemporary, digital, print, fiction, and nonfiction texts. The course explores a variety of pedagogical strategies for teaching diverse literary traditions to students of various backgrounds and developmental levels. Students will engage both the philosophical and practical dimensions of secondary English teaching by reflecting on readings, designing units, and presenting to one another. Woven into this course will be opportunities for regular writing, examination of digital resources, and strategies for combating the phenomenon termed “readicide.” Engaging the complexities of lesson planning and assessment, students will create a unit centered on a literary text(s) of their choosing.
Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)
ENGL 4520/SCED 4300
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms/Clinical Experience II English
Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller English 4520 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. Students are required to also register for SCED 4300 (002), the clinical experience that accompanies this course. Paired together, these courses provide an opportunity to peer deeply into classroom moments and learn about teaching and learning from a range of educational stakeholders, including secondary students, peers, mentor teachers, and scholars. Beyond reading about or practicing teaching tasks, these courses aim to help you help you develop a robust understanding of literacy from the perspective of a teacher in diverse classroom settings. Collectively, we use our course reading (Fires in the Bathroom: Advice for Teachers from High School Students, Differentiated Instructional Strategies: One Size Doesn’t Fit All, Educating for Empathy: Literacy Learning and Civic Engagement, and additional scholarship) and experiences in the clinical to examine classroom teachers’ roles as literacy educators. To that end, you will actively study scholarship related to teaching and learning, observe learners and learning communities, provide instructional support, deliver instruction, and reflect upon your process of becoming a teacher. Engaging in each of these processes provides an opportunity to grapple with the connection between educational theory and practice.
Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)
ENGL 4540
Teaching Creative Writing
Dr. Jason Olsen 

Students in this course will learn methods for successfully teaching creative writing at multiple levels, from K-12 to college. The strategies taught will include development and management of a classroom creative writing workshop (with an emphasis on teaching the language of creative criticism) and how best to teach literature in a creative writing environment (and teaching students how to read as writers rather than academics). The main text for the semester will be one the students will create: as we work through the different facets of workshops and literature, I will assign students to write on specific creative writing themes (that will be discussed throughout the semester) and after peer workshop and editing, these writing projects will evolve into chapters and the multiple chapters the students contribute will compose a student-created text.

 

ENGL 5330
Race and Ethnicity in Literature
Dr. Christopher González This course is designed to explore conceptions and expressions of race and ethnicity in literature. In this specific section of ENGL 5330, we will examine race and ethnicity in the United States through the literary medium of imagetext, colloquially known as “comics,” within the genre of life writing/non-fiction. In addition to studying the selected works, students should expect to create comics and practice within the medium itself (Note: no experience in visual art is required). Students who are interested in studying or writing non-fiction, who have an interest in visual storytelling, and/or who have a keen interest in issues of racial and ethnic representation in storytelling will find the course insightful. Readings will focus on works about famous individuals such as Congressman John Lewis, Hall of Fame baseballer Roberto Clemente, film star and activist George Takei, and also memoir imagetext by Thi Bui, Lila Quintero Weaver, and Art Spiegelman.
Creative Writing: 4000+ Lit 
Literature: Special Topics
Teaching: 4000+ Lit
ENGL 5410
Studies in Writing for Digital Media Production: Disability Studies and Accessibility
Dr. Jared Colton To design accessible environments and documents, technical communicators must understand how people with disabilities access digital media. 41 million Americans (or 15% of the total U.S. population) “have some level of disability” (U.S. Census Bureau). It seems like common sense to keep accessibility in mind from the start of and throughout the life of a project; however, many technical communicators still see certain aspects of accessible design as a painful necessity or a nearly forgotten add-on at the end of a project. This course seeks to make accessibility a crucial element of technical communication rather than just an add-on. Students will be exposed to and discuss a number of theories and arguments about accessibility. We will explore accessibility through a lens of disability studies and disability activism, which provide additional contexts for understanding the importance of accessibility within physical and digital environments. While we will learn about and discuss disability and accessibility at large, we will focus on considering and producing rhetorically effective closed-captions in videos and producing digital documents for people who are blind or have low vision. By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of disability theory, be able to make a strong case for accessible design, have improved their video production and design skills, and understand how to approach multiple technologies and rhetorical situations for accessibility.
Tech Comm: TCR Major Course
ENGL 5420
Project Management for Technical Communication
 Dr. Avery Edenfield The focus of this course is learning how to successfully manage complex writing projects in diverse teams. The technical communication field increasingly requires technical writing professionals to be able to demonstrate skills in collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, interpersonal communication, multi-tasking, and teamwork. In this course, you will gain experience in these areas by working on a semester-long writing and research project. This course is intended to give students hands-on practice working as a team on a long project with multiple (graded) components. This semester, students will work in teams to work on projects related to sexual assault prevention at USU. The Sexual Assault Prevention Team, including SAAVI and the Title IX office, will be clients for the course, working with students to design effective messaging related to sexual assault prevention. Students will not only practice managing complex projects with multiple deadlines and deliverables but will also have the opportunity to make a lasting impact at USU. Students will have the opportunity to create various artifacts for their professional portfolios and to build their resumes in various project management and professional writing skills such as working with various software, working with stakeholders, designing a variety of documents, creating multimedia projects, and more. Student projects could be used in upcoming Sexual Assault Prevention Campaigns as well as distributed on social media and through websites, including to satellite campuses and the media. For more information, email avery.edenfield@usu.edu
Tech Comm: TCR Major Course
ENGL 5450
Special Topics in Creative Writing: Toni Morrison
Dr. Natalie Rogers In this course, we will celebrate the work of Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, whose groundbreaking novels challenge readers to confront the legacy of racism and sexism in American society. Students will practice reading as a writer by studying Morrison’s major themes and formal innovations in The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, and Beloved. Final grades will be based on class participation, a critical group presentation, and a final creative assignment.
Creative Writing: Special Topics



Fall Semester 2019 Undergraduate Courses

Course                      

Instructor     

Course Description

ENGLA 2060
Literature and Diversity


MWF 8:30-9:20 am

Dr. John Gamber  The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. As such it is necessarily important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within the communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course will examine literature, mainly 21st Century novels (set in the past, the present, and in sci-fi and horror/zombie apocalyptic futures), by Native American authors and authors of color, with a particular focus on narratives of movement: immigration, relocation, and diaspora. We will pay careful attention to the intersections of sexuality, gender, and class with these racialized structures.

ENGL 2600
Literary Analys

MWF 10:30-11:20 am

Lezlie Ann Christensen-Branum

Writing-intensive course in literary analysis and research. Introduces English majors to techniques and problems of critical interpretation.

Requirements filled: English Core (Literature)

ENGL 2600
Literary Analysis

TR 12:00 - 1:15

Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato

How do you analyze a text? How do you write an essay? This class will answer those questions, and more! We’ll be reading Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill HouseThe Humans by Steven Karam, and lots of poetry. Expect discussions and workshops, as well as a couple of field trips across campus.

ENGL 2600
Literary Analysis

Dr. Chris Gonzalez

This course is required of all English majors. It provides intensive training for critical literary analysis and research by applying literary theory to significant works of literature. Readings/viewings will span a range of literary narrative forms, including narrative prose, poetry, graphic narratives, film, and more. The works of literature under examination will include a diverse array of selections by authors of the United States. Literary research will comprise evaluation of primary and secondary texts, effective strategies for analytical composition, and careful theoretical considerations all with the goal of writing a critical essay.

ENGL/AMST 2630
Survey of American Culture

Offered: 

Dustin Crawford 

In this course, we examine the intersection of war and American culture in literature, film, speeches, and music from the Vietnam era to present. Students will evaluate documentaries and readings from myriad perspectives, and then synthesize the role war and peace movements play in shaping American values, global presence, and militarism.

Requirements filled: English Core (Culture)

ENGL/AMST 2640
Introduction to Ethnic Studies 

MWF 9:30-10:20 am 

Dr. John Gamber 

The concept of race has always informed the cultures and bodies within and overlapping the boundaries of the United States. This being the case, it is of great importance that we engage in serious ways with race as a social construct. This course serves as an introduction to key issues in the study of race and ethnicity. We will begin with an examination of the history of the concept of race, move to an understanding of intersectionality (the reality that race can’t be separated from others categories of gender, sexuality, class, status, and ability, among others), then read key documents of the Civil Rights Era, and conclude with contemporary racialized issues including immigration, mass incarceration, and the myth of a “colorblind” society.

ENGL 2720

Survey of American Folklore


TR 1:30 – 2:45 pm

Dr. Lynne McNeill

This class provides a survey of American folk cultures, covering a wide range of genres--from narratives, customs, and beliefs, to folksongs, memes, and material culture--as they manifest in diverse folk groups such as regional, ethnic, occupational, and interest-based communities. Students will conduct ethnographic research and will compile their own collection of folklore for preservation in the Fife Folklore Archives.

ENGL 3305
Medieval Literary History


TR 9:00-10:00

Dr. Christine Cooper-Rompato

 Monks, Pilgrims, Vikings, and Gods
This course travels through almost 1,000 years of British literary history, starting with the earliest writings in the Anglo-Saxon world about warriors (like Beowulf!), charms, and religion, and then moving to the Viking world where we will read several sagas and tales from Norse mythology by the Icelandic writer Snorri Sturluson. We will then cross the great divide of the Anglo-Norman Conquest and read romance lais by Marie de France, before moving to Middle English lyrics and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. We will end the class with the medieval best seller, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, one of many texts that prove medieval people knew the world was round. The highlight of the class will be a manuscript project in the Merrill-Cazier Library’s special collections, where we will become medieval scribes and copy a leaf onto parchment and/or papyrus with ink and quill pens. 

ENGL 3335 
Nineteenth-Century British Literary History: Victorian Social Networks – Village, Town, and City

 

TR 1:30 - 2:45 pm

Dr. Brian McCuskey

In this class, we will explore the growth of social networks in England over the course of the nineteenth century, from the changing village of Highbury in Jane Austen’s Emma (1815), to the booming 1830s town of Middlemarch in George Eliot’s retrospective 1872 novel, to the chaotic city of London in Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1853).   As social networks grow larger and more complex, what happens to individual and group psychology?  To friendships and family relations?  To ethical codes and moral choices?  While the course focuses on these three novels, treating them as a trilogy, we will also mix in a variety of lyric poems and nonfiction excerpts, helping us to think further about both literary form and cultural history.

 

ENGL 3375

American Literary History since 1900

 Dustin Crawford This course explores American speculative fiction, film/drama, and poetry from 1900-present. We will read dystopian and science fictions works from Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Margaret Atwood. 

ENGL 3385

Postcolonial World Literature: Caribbean Literature from Jamaica & the Lesser Antilles

MWF 1:30 - 2:20

 Dr. Shane Graham  

The Caribbean is a place of raucous Carnival celebrations; of reggae, calypso, and soca music; of lush landscapes, tropical beaches, and warm seas; of rich folklore and a thousand vibrant creoles and dialects. 

The Caribbean is a place whose residents often live in dismal poverty and whose ancestors were brought to the islands as slaves or indentured servants; where governments are often corrupt and sometimes authoritarian; where crime is widespread and violent; where climate change and rising sea levels threaten the very possibility of human habitation.

Both of the above sets of statements are equally true. The literature of the Caribbean navigates the resulting paradoxes and contradictions, and this course will survey that body of literature, covering most of its history (beginning with Saint-Jean Perse’s Eloges, published in 1911, and Claude McKay’s Constabulary Ballads from 1912) and the major genres of poetry, short stories, novels, plays, and essays. It will focus mostly on English-language literature, with some translated works from the French islands. And it will focus on literature from Jamaica (the largest and most populous island in the former British West Indies) and from the Lesser Antilles, a chain of islands on the eastern edge of the Caribbean Basin, including Trinidad & Tobago, Barbados, St. Lucia, Martinique, Dominica, Antigua, and Guadaloupe.

NOTE TO STUDENTS: Previous familiarity with Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe is not required, but will be very helpful in taking this class.

ENGL 3400
Introduction to Technical Communication

Faculty- TBA

This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3410
Technical Communication Technologies

MWF 11:30-12:20

Dr. Ryan Moeller This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3420
Fiction Writing

MWF 9:30-10:20 am

Faculty- TBA

 Covers basic elements of writing fiction: form, structure, plot, theme, characterization, dialogue, point of view, and imagery.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Creative Writing (Required Intro),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3420

Fiction Writing 

MWF 1:30-2:30 pm

Anne Stark 

This is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected.  Students generate stories, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, and look at published models from various subgenres of fiction, especially celebrating diverse voices. We execute methods of workshopping from established writing program protocol, designed to produce a more expansive second version of the story. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3430
Poetry Writing

TR 9:00-10:15 am 

Shanan Ballam

In this energetic workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myth and fairytale. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm!

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3430
Poetry Writing

TR 12:00-1:15 pm

Dr. Michael Sowder

English 3430 is an introductory poetry-writing workshop. In this class we will experiment with writing various forms of poetry, using an excellent introductory book, Steven Kowit’s In the Palm of Your Hand.  In addition, we will look at two books of poetry by two of our own faculty poets. We will analyze poems together, old and new, to see how they achieve their power, and we will learn from each other by workshopping student poems in large and small group workshops. Students will write and revise ten new poems, including several poems in form, and write an ars poetica, a personal philosophy of poetry writing.
Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Creative Nonfiction Writing

TR 1:30-2:45 pm

John Engler

Nonfiction writing is everywhere and has never been more sought after. Here you will have the chance to practice writing memoir and personal essay in a hands-on, workshop-style course. No topic or personal experience is too large or too small, too conventional or too radical to warrant exploration. Whatever you have to say, we'll help you practice the craft and outfit your writer’s toolbox with the skills to say it well.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Creative Nonfiction Writing

TR 9:00-10:15

Russ Beck 

English 3440 will focus on crafting nonfiction. Few parameters will be placed on the subjects of the writing projects, but the class will emphasize narrative and personal writing. Assignment mediums will include traditional essays and experiments in new media. We will hone existing skills and work to create new ones through a mix of lectures, workshops and out-of-class. 

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3450
Methods and Research in Professional and Technical Communication

 

Faculty TBA Technical communicators frequently engage in research to answer questions or address problems in the workplace. This course is designed to prepare you to work successfully as a technical writer by learning how to craft a research question; how to select appropriate methods to address a particular research question; how to ethically collect and analyze data; and how to report research findings and their associated implications (i.e., research-based recommendations). By partnering with a client for the full semester, you will practice applying all that you are learning within a real organizational context, learning about how you can conduct research to address real organizational problems and questions.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Theory)

ENGL 3460

Modern Rhetorical Theory

MWF 10:30 - 11:20

 Dr. Jared Colton Broadly considered, rhetoric is defined as the art or science of persuasion. English 3460 introduces you to rhetoric and rhetorical theory—as applied to analysis (as a research method) and performance. We will study classical and contemporary theories of rhetoric and learn about how people are persuaded through language to act, how language makes meaning, the role of discourse in organizing human activity, and the nature of rhetorical worldviews (ideologies). We will also examine noteworthy rhetorical scholars past and present to inform our understanding of the theory. Our study will be conducted through reading, discussion, and application of writings by an extensive range of rhetoricians (people who study, research, and theorize rhetoric), as well as rhetors (people who perform rhetoric). 

ENGL 3470
Approaches to Research in English Studies

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Joyce Kinkead

This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Understanding and using these complementary approaches are particularly appropriate to students in the English Teaching emphasis. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3500/SCED 3300

Teaching English and Clinical Experience I

MWF 10:30 – 11:20

 Dr. Joyce Kinkead  This Teaching English clinical experience is paired with the one-credit course, SCED 3300 Clinical 1, to provide students with hands-on experience working in secondary school classrooms. Students will meet in class and also work in schools 30 hours over the semester. The goal of the clinical experience is for pre-service teachers to begin to view the classroom and its students from the perspective of a teacher. Throughout your undergraduate education, you have focused on subject matter content; in this experience, you’ll be looking more closely at the process of teaching and learning. In particular, you’ll be observing how a teacher functions in the classroom as well as the teacher’s relationships with students, parents, colleagues, and school leaders. You will also have the opportunity to practice teaching in the classroom.

ENGL 3510
Teaching Young Adult Literature

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

 

English 3510 is one of four required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices. Through the process of reading and discussing a wide range of diverse young adult literature, we will explore central trends and issues in the field of Young Adult Literature and a variety of ways of interpreting, analyzing, and teaching YA Lit. 

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3610
Multicultural American Literature

 

Dr. Chris Gonzalez

Because the presence of diverse peoples and literatures reaches back to even before the founding of the United States, an exploration of multicultural literature in U.S. is no small matter. The aim of this course is to engage in a deep, substantive examination of this rich tradition of literary and cultural production by investigating works of American literature since 2001. We will explore the works from a range of authors that illuminate the cultural experiences of many Americans across varied media forms and genres (fiction, poetry, life writing, comics, music, film). We will proceed with the goal of understanding how these authors, through the creation of their narratives, reorient our current understandings of American identity. 

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; American), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; American)

ENGL 3630

The Farm in Literature and Culture

MWF 10:30 - 11:20

 

Bonnie Bastian Moore This course examines literature related to the farm, farming, and agriculture in the broad definition of the word, including written texts, images, music (folk song, farm ballads, and country), film, and material culture such as quilts,  and covers texts ranging from an ancient Sumerian almanac, Chaucer, Jefferson, Steinbeck, and Cather to more modern writers like Wendell Berry, Michael Pollan, Novella Carpenter, and Kristin Kimball. Students from a wide variety of majors including music, economics, business, education, communications, English, and engineering, as well as agriculture-related majors have found the course engaging, interesting, and valuable.

ENGL/ANTH/HIST/RELS 3710

Special Topics in Folklore: Folklore and Death

 

 

Mary Kay Gabriel

Death comes a-knocking at everyone’s door. How do we cope? Through vampires, zombies, deals with the devil, parades, songs about dead babies, and art made from long- dead monks’ bones, that’s how.

Learn to look at death through the eyes of a folklorist. Funeral and cremation workers are folk groups? Spirit photographs of the dead were considered proof of life after death? Bodysnatching was the precursor to today’s body donation programs? Soldiers have informal rituals to ward off death?

Sign up for the folklore program’s online version of “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Folklore and Death” course to learn how informal traditions and beliefs, strange and irreverent they may seem on the surface, are used to confront the collective experience of Death with a capital D.

 

ENGL 4210

History of the English Language

Online

 

Dr. John McLaughlin English 4210 traces the history of the English language from the earliest evidence to the present day, analyzing the variety and diversity of the social and linguistic world of English, from the island of Great Britain to every corner of the world.   

ENGL 4300

Shakespeare: Comedies, Tragedies, Histories

TR 10:30 - 11:45

Dr. Phebe Jensen The purpose of this course is to help students 1) begin or continue a life-long process of enjoying Shakespeare’s plays; 2) explore the theatrical and cultural contexts that originally informed Shakespeare’s plays; and 3) understand Shakespeare’s plays as living texts that have been and continue to be reinterpreted. Students will gain a broader understanding of both Shakespeare’s work and modern reinterpretations as they learn factual knowledge about Shakespeare’s world, the early modern theater, and the genre of drama.  In addition to six Shakespeare plays—The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, Part One, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, and Pericles—students will be required to see four films, and learn critical background about Shakespeare and his world through class lectures and readings in The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare.

ENGL 4310

American Writers: Kerouac and the Beats

TR 1:30 – 2:45

 

Dr. Paul Crumbley

If you are interested in learning about Beat culture and like the idea of getting out of the classroom to create a public exhibit, this is the course for you. Students will study a representative sampling of major literary works that contributed to the Beat movement and develop exhibits using materials contained in the Beat Collection that is part of USU Special Collections and Archives (SCA), plus art works selected from the permanent collection at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA). The Beat Collection is an extensive archive of small magazines, experimental publications, broadsides, limited-edition books, and Beat scholarship. The first five weeks of the course will be spent looking at the collection and considering strategies for making use of it. During that time, members of the class will read a brief introduction to Beat culture, Jack Kerouac’s The Dharma Bums, and a sampling of works by major Beat poets. The next five weeks will be dedicated to selecting materials from the Beat Collection and NEHMA that will become the basis for an exhibit curated by the class with the support of specialists at SCA and NEHMA. The final five weeks will be dedicated to installing the exhibit at NEHMA, planning an opening, and writing a short paper about the exhibit.

ENGL 4330

World Writers: Achebe and Adichie, Two Nigerian Novelists

MWF 10:30 - 11:20
Dr. Shane Graham

When a 28-year-old Nigerian Igbo man named Chinua Achebe published Things Fall Apart in 1958, it was by no means the first English-language novel by an African writer, but it almost immediately became the best known, and signaled the beginning of an outpouring of writing from Nigeria and elsewhere in Africa in English, French, Arabic, and Portuguese, including four subsequent novels by Achebe.

The catalog description for ENGL 4330 says that it will study “[s]elected works of either a single author or a closely related group of authors based outside the United States, with attention to biographical and cultural contexts.” In this course, then, we will read large swaths of Achebe’s literary writings and essays, while also focusing on another Igbo writer born some two generations after Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. She has recently emerged as the twenty-first-century heir to Achebe’s throne among Igbo novelists. Like Achebe, many of her writings depict the long-lasting effects of English colonialism on Nigerian cultural traditions and practices, and the difficulties that Nigerians have reconciling their traditions with incursions of modernity in such various forms as Christianity, globalization, and European education.

In addition to Achebe’s first four novels (Things Fall Apart, Arrow of God, No Longer at Ease, and A Man of the People) and Adichie’s first two novels (Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun), we will read stories, poems, and essays by Achebe, Adichie, and other Nigerian writers, as well as selected work of literary criticism and theory.

NOTE TO STUDENTS: Previous familiarity with Conrad’s Heart of Darkness is not required, but will be very helpful in taking this class.

ENGL 4340

Studies in Fiction

MWF 12:30 - 1:20
Faculty TBA Topic TBA. This course is an analysis of the genre of prose fiction, emphasizing the nature and evolution of specific forms.

ENGL 4400
Professional Editing

TR 12:00 - 1:15

Dr. Keith Grant-Davie

Whether or not your job title includes the word “editor,” you will find that good editing skills are an excellent way to move ahead in your workplace. A good professional/technical editor understands how language works, how others will likely expect it to be used, and how to craft it effectively—not just by copyediting and proofreading but also by editing comprehensively for content, organization, style, graphics, and document design. Most of your work in this course will be hands-on editing. By the end of the course, you should be able to do these things:

  • Evaluate documents’ editing needs and state specific editing priorities and objectives for the given rhetorical situation,
  • Copyedit and comprehensively edit documents written for a variety of audiences and/or clients, using both traditional copy marking and proofreading methods and electronic editing methods,
Assess the ethical, social, and technological implications of editing and act responsibly in light of these implications.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

 

ENGL 4420

Advanced Fiction Writing

 MW 2:00 – 3:20

Dr. Charles Waugh

 

 

The purpose of this advanced fiction writing course is to allow you to make the step from story dabbler to serious fiction writer, and to help you, as M.S. Bell says, “deploy unconsciously, intuitively, instinctively” the rudimentary skills you learned in the introductory course.  The readings of our own work will be the basis for our workshop discussions, which means you must read the work in advance and come to class prepared with notes to help you give thoughtful, constructive criticism. We will also read exemplary texts to help us better understand what creates good writing, to train ourselves always to read as a writer, and to find how a particular word or sentence contributes to the overall effect. As a writer, you should cultivate a similar approach to life, the goal being to become what Henry James called, “one of the people on whom nothing is lost.” The success of the workshop will depend entirely on your own inventiveness, your complete engagement and full participation, and your abilities to recognize the narratological nuts and bolts of a story, to not be swept along by plot, to be critical but supportive, and to remember that the text is being critiqued, not the author.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4410

Document Design

MWF 12: 30 - 1:20

 Dr. Rebecca Walton  This course will provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge about document design to enable you to make and defend design decisions when creating documents for professional contexts. You will engage in an iterative, research-informed process called design thinking. You will also learn about the human visual system and how the human body perceives visual information. You will learn about sketching, typography, color, and graphics. You will have multiple opportunities to apply your skills within complex, real-world contexts by working in teams to develop an information product that addresses a problem of your choice encountered by USU undergraduate students. There is no required textbook for this class. 

ENGL 4430
Advanced Poetry Writing

TR 10:30 – 11:45

 
Dr. Ben Gunsberg

This advanced poetry writing course is designed to enhance the skills you’ve developed in other writing courses by exposing you to a wide range of poetry written by established authors and by your peers. Our conversations will revolve around craft, which means we will explore time-honored categories and techniques as well as more recent developments in the field. Similar to other “workshop” courses, this course offers many opportunities for you to share your work in small and large groups.  You are expected to comment generously on your classmates’ poems both in writing and during class discussion. In this way, you will cultivate a personal aesthetic and expand the breadth of your critical literary vocabulary. Beyond writing and revising individual poems on a weekly basis, you will assemble a final portfolio consisting of your most successful writing.  Because this is an advanced course, I expect you to submit 3-5 of these poems to a literary journal before the conclusion of the semester

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4440
Advanced Nonfiction Writing

F 12:30-3:20 pm

 

Dr. Jennifer Sinor

The advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the intro course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This semester we will be studying the braided essay. Students will write a robust essay that weaves together three narrative strands: a site visit, a research thread, and a personal strand. Students will learn how to conduct site visits, how to interview, and about the power of research to yield a metaphor that can bind disparate strands together. While we will read model essays, work with the librarians, and discuss the practicalities as well as the ethics of conducting living research, the focus of the course will be on the writing workshop itself

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing) 

ENGL 4500
Teaching Writing

Th 5:15-7:45 pm

(This is a blended course that meets via interactive video conferencing every other week)

Dr. Amy Piotrowski

This course, designed for students in the English Teaching program, discusses methods for teaching writing in middle school and high school English classrooms.  We'll talk about how to plan writing lessons, how to assess student writing, and how to teach students to write in a variety of genres and media.  We'll also explore what it means to write and teach writing in our digital age.  Expect to research effective teaching methods and to share what you learn in a multigenre digital project and to develop a unit plan that engages secondary students in sound learning about the craft of writing.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4510

Teaching Literature

TR 1:30 – 2:45

 Dr. Ben Gunsberg  English 4510 prepares students to teach literature, including print literature, film, television, and print journalism. The course explores a variety of pedagogical strategies for teaching diverse literary traditions to students of various backgrounds and developmental levels. Students will engage both the philosophical and practical dimensions of secondary English teaching by reflecting on readings, designing units, and delivering instruction to one another. Woven into this course will be opportunities for regular writing, examination of digital resources, and sustained work on a piece of literature that is of special interest to each student. Students will build a library of digital and print-based professional resources that will support their efforts within and beyond this course. Engaging the complexities of lesson planning and assessment, students will create a unit centered on a literary text(s) of their choosing. 

ENGL 4520
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms / Clinical Experience II English

M 4:00 – 6:30

Admission to the STEP program is required.

 

Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont

Schools serve an increasing number of students who come from diverse backgrounds. Such diversity suggests that one-size-fits-all curriculum and instruction will not serve the varied literacy learning needs of students. This course, designed for students in the English Teaching emphasis, will focus on meeting the needs of all learners. You will learn to differentiate lessons for the students in contemporary secondary English classrooms. You must register for both ENGL 4520 and SCED 4300 in the same semester.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 5300

Special Topics in Literature: Natural Magic – Environmentalism in the English Renaissance

TR 12:00 – 1:15

 Dr. Phebe Jensen  In Shakespeare’s England the practice of natural magic was an academic, scholarly pursuit dedicated to understanding man’s connections to the natural world, and exploiting those connections.  The human body was understood to share key qualities with other living things in the natural world, including plants and animals.  In this course students will learn about such early modern theories concerning science, magic, and the environment.  We will study works by William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, and Andrew Marvell in order to explore those poets’ representation of the human body, mind, and emotions, and the perceived connection between humans, plants, animals, minerals, the planets and the stars.  We will also use this analysis to explore modern environmental theories, including new materialism and the concept of the post-human.  The course will end with a modern novel—Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake—through which we’ll consider the usefulness of a Renaissance perspective to understanding the modern ecological imagination.

ENGL 5400

Social Justice: "Gender, Rhetoric, and Technology"

TR 1:30 - 2:45

Dr. Avery Edenfield

In this topics course, students examine the role of ethics and social justice in technical communication, learning to connect theory and heuristics with applied expertise and decision making. Drawing on rhetorical, cultural, and critical theories, this class interrogates the intersection of gender, rhetoric, and technology, specifically as they relate to technical communication as a field and as a profession. Students will explore this territory through a range of technical communication topics including aesthetics and design, UX, (dis)ability, and embodiment. This class will explore these topics with an intersectional lens regarding race, class, and sexuality.

 

Related to the intersections of gender, rhetoric, and technology, students will:  

  • Learn to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view
  • Learn to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)
  • Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course
In addition to completing regular reflections on the assigned reading, students will conduct research and write papers. There is no required textbook for this class.

ENGL 5430

Technical Communication Capstone

M 1:30 - 4:00
 Dr. Ryan Moeller  This course is designed to prepare you to successfully negotiate the job market after graduating with a degree in English studies. While the course was designed as a required capstone experience for students in the Professional and Technical Writing emphasis of the major, all students can benefit from a sustained and critical look at their professional identity materials. You will learn how to professionalize and present your experiences as a student/worker/intern to potential employers and to develop successful job materials, such as a portfolio website, resume, cover letter, social media presence, interviewing strategies, and more!

ENGL 5450

Special Topics in Creative Writing: Long Form Fiction

MW 12:30 – 1:50
Dr. Charles Waugh The purpose of this special topics course is to explore the structures and creative demands of long forms of fiction: novels, novellas, and long stories. Students will read some theories of the novel alongside exemplary long forms of fiction, map how those stories are structured, make maps of their own long work, and write 40-60 pages of their own fiction that will be workshopped in the second half of the semester. 

ENGL 5490

Special Topics in Professional and Technical Writing: “Media Culture”

TR 10:30 - 11:45

Dr. Avery Edenfield

In this course, we explore the intersection of technical writing and media culture, with special attention to digital rhetorics. Drawing from technical communication research, rhetorical theory, and philosophy, we will cover a range of topics including rhetoric of technology, rhetoric of code, new media, algorithmic justice, privacy and security, digital democracy, and hacktivism.

 

In this course, students will:

  • Learn to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view.
  • Learn to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions).
  • Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course.
In addition to completing regular reflections on the assigned reading, students will design a range of projects and presentations in a variety of media. There is no required textbook for this class.

 





Spring Semester 2019 Undergraduate Courses

Course                      

Instructor     

Course Description

ENGL/HIST/ANTHR 2210
Introduction to Folklore


Online 

 Heidi Williams Introduction to major genres of folklore: fairy-tales, urban legends, creation myths, jokes, calendar customs, material culture, religious folklore, occupational folklore, children’s folklore, and digital folklore. The final project consists of basic folklore research methods: interviewing and collecting. Cross-listed as: ANTH 2210, ENGL 2210, and HIST 2210. 

ENGL 2600
Literary Analysis

MWF 10:30 – 11:20 

 

Dr. Paul Crumbley

This is a required course for all English majors. The class introduces approaches to literary analysis that emphasize close reading and provide strategies for writing about fiction, poetry, and drama. Course texts include an introduction to literary analysis that examines all three genres, plus F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, August Wilson’s Fences, and May Swenson’s Nature: Poems Old and New. Students will complete close readings of literary texts, discuss the aims of analytic argument, review key organizational principles, learn how to incorporate primary and secondary materials, and practice writing papers using the MLA format.

Requirements filled: English Core (Literature)

ENGL 2630
Survey of American Culture

MWF 11:30 – 12:20

Susan Anderson

This class encourages you to combine, cross, and stretch conventional boundaries as you study the diversity and complexity of American cultures at the local, regional, national, and global levels. We will consider the waves of feminism, including #MeToo; examine Civil Rights protest through the film Selma; broaden the meaning of “text” and assess American virtues through a study of Disneyland; and consider diverse perspectives, including a family of survivalists in Idaho as we read Tara Westover’s bestselling memoir, Educated.

Requirements filled: English Core (Culture)

ENGL 3315
Early Modern British Literary History


MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Phebe Jensen

This course introduces students to the literature and culture of early modern England from the reign of Henry VIIIth until just after the English Civil War (approximately 1500-1670).  Students will study major works by preeminent writers of the period—Sir Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton—in the context of the religious, political, and cultural movements of the period, including the humanist movements of the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the exploration and colonization of what Europeans called the New World, ongoing debates about women’s role and authority, and the emergence of new scientific paradigms on the cusp of the seventeenth century scientific revolution, and the English Civil War.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; British), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History)

ENGL 3325

Eighteenth-Century British Literary History: The Marriage Plot from Milton to Austen


TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Mattie Burkert

This course is designed to familiarize you with British literature of what is known as the “long eighteenth century,” which extends from about 1660 to the turn of the nineteenth century. More specifically, we will examine the representation of marriage in the period by reading a wide range of literary texts in a variety of genres. These will include John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost; stage comedies by William Congreve and Susanna Centlivre; philosophical treatises by John Locke; satirical engravings by William Hogarth; Samuel Richardson’s smash hit sentimental novel Pamela and the parodies it inspired; and Jane Austen's quintessential novel of manners, Pride and Prejudice. As we will see, texts that revolve around a “marriage plot” do not merely consider the pleasures and perils of finding a spouse; they also raise questions about gender, sexuality, economics, social class, political subjectivity, religion, and law that continue to resonate today.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; British), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History)

ENGL 3355
Literary History of the Early Americas


MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Dr. Keri Holt

This course examines the literature of the early Americas, including writing and oral narratives from indigenous communities, Spanish, French, and British colonial literature from North and South America, and the literature of the early United States. In doing so, we will look at a range of genres, including pictography, letters, essays, exploration narratives, captivity accounts, legends, poems, autobiographies, novels, and drama. Classes will be discussion-based, with an emphasis on exploring varied perspectives in the early Americas, from those in power and those without power, those in the majority and those on the margins. We will also focus on reading works in conjunction with their historical contexts, working closely with primary and secondary sources to develop strong research and analysis skills. By the end of the course, you should have a more thorough understanding of the early history of American literature, as well as how this history, combined with your own critical reading and writing skills, can inform and influence our understanding of American literature and culture in the present.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; American), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; American)

ENGL 3395 
World Literature in Translation: Classical Mythology

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Dr. Steven Shively

The focus for this course will be mostly Greek with some Roman mythology. We’ll read and study time-honored stories of love, war, religion, justice, heroes, villains, and monsters as we learn how a culture’s mythology both reflects and creates its culture. We’ll also look at ways classical myths have influenced later literature. Visual art and music will occasionally complement our study of textual versions of the myths. Specific texts will include Mythology, by Edith Hamilton, for cultural context, background information, and great storytelling; Homer’s The Iliad and The Odyssey; and Medea, by Euripides. This is a reading-heavy course. Requirements will include active participation, reading quizzes, exams, approximately 3 short papers, and a researched argument paper.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; World), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; World)

ENGL 3400
Professional Writing

TR 10:30 – 11:45
AND
TR 12:00 – 1:15

Sherena Huntsman

This course introduces you to the field of technical communication. In this course, you will   will create a variety of workplace documents through the process of proposing, composing, designing, and revising. In so doing, you will apply fundamental concepts required to be a skilled communicator in a variety of workplaces. This course will also teach you how to synthesize and evaluate arguments about technology and society relevant to technical communicators. You will draw upon these competencies when you work collaboratively to present technical information to a variety of audiences.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3410
Professional Writing Technology

TR 3:00 – 4:15

Cana Uluak Itchuaqiyaq  The main focus of this course is learning how to learn technologies. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be adept at using a variety of technologies and knowing how to select the best tool(s) to accomplish a particular task. In this course, you will not only gain experience with three core software programs but also develop or strengthen your sense of adventure, tenacity, and confidence in evaluating, learning, and using technologies relevant to technical communication. Professional Communication Technologies is a pre-requisite for several courses such as ENGL 4410 Document Design and Graphics, and it is a prerequisite for entering the professional and technical communication major. 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Intro)

ENGL 3420
Introduction to Fiction Writing

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

Anne Stark

 This course is structured primarily as a workshop, in which all students share their fiction writing with their peers. The class functions as a community of writers, each supporting one another in creating prose, while understanding the vital importance of the reader in the writing process.  Class participation is essential, but no prior fiction writing experience is expected. We practice various models of story generation, discuss the vocabulary of the craft, write in class, look at published examples from various genres, and learn the methods of workshopping designed to most effectively critique each other’s work.  These methods come from established writing program protocol. At the end of the semester, each student will produce a portfolio of short fiction that can later be submitted for publication or developed into a novel.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Creative Writing (Required Intro),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3420

Introduction to Fiction Writing

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Amber Caron

 This course is for students with little or no experience writing fiction. Students will read published stories with a number of questions in mind: What are the components of a story? How do writers create memorable characters? How does time work in a story? How can dialogue reveal character? In what ways does setting evoke emotion? With answers to these and other craft-based questions, students will apply this new knowledge to their own short stories. Writing prompts and exercises will push students to take literary risks, and workshops will help students revise and polish their work. This course will also prepare students for advanced fiction workshops.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3430
Introduction to Poetry Writing

TR 10:30 – 11:45
AND
TR 1:30 – 2:45

Shanan Ballam

In this energetic workshop-based course, we’ll analyze and practice a variety of poetic techniques from musicality to metaphor to drawing material from common stories, such as myth and fairytale. No experience in poetry writing is necessary—all you need is enthusiasm!

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

MWF 11:30 – 12:20

Robb Kunz

This course will be broken into two parts: the study of creative nonfiction techniques and the crafting of original creative pieces. Students will study/read a wide variety of essays, flash, mixed-media, and illustrative/graphic examples from writers across the creative nonfiction genre. Students will then be asked to mimic form and style from specific writers while incorporating their personal experience and memories. Towards the end of the semester, students will craft an “essay,” in the form of their choice, to workshop with the entire class. Workshop will attempt to teach students how to share their work in a large group setting while communicating constructive impressions/ideas to their peers.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3440
Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

MW 12:30 – 1:50

Dr. Jennifer Sinor

In this course, we will be establishing the building blocks for creative nonfiction: scene, summary, musing, character, and dialogue. We will focus on autobiographical writing, specifically memoir or personal essay. Creative nonfiction always revolves around the “I,” even when the pronoun makes no appearance on the page, but in memoir and personal essay the “I” is what carries the piece—a thinking mind at work. As Scott Sanders writes, “I choose to write about my experience not because it is mine, but because it seems to open a door through which others might pass.”  Class time is primarily dedicated to full-class workshops with a portfolio of work due at the end of the semester.

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing),Creative Writing (Required Intro) 

ENGL 3450
Methods and Research in Professional and Technical Communication

MW 11:30 – 12:45

Dr. Rebecca Walton

Technical communicators frequently engage in research to answer questions or address problems in the workplace. This course is designed to prepare you to work successfully as a technical writer by learning how to craft a research question; how to select appropriate methods to address a particular research question; how to ethically collect and analyze data; and how to report research findings and their associated implications (i.e., research-based recommendations). By partnering with a client for the full semester, you will practice applying all that you are learning within a real organizational context, learning about how you can conduct research to address real organizational problems and questions.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required Theory)

ENGL 3470
Approaches to Research in English Studies

W 5:15 – 7:45
(Note: This is a blended broadcast course that meets via interactive videoconferencing every other week.)

Dr. Amy Piotrowski

 This course for English majors introduces students to multiple methods of conducting research in English, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Understanding and using these complementary approaches are particularly appropriate to students in the English Teaching emphasis. The course examines current research, principles of research design, and instruments of data collection. Students will undertake two research projects: a whole class research project that provides practice in research methods, and an individual research project.  We will present research findings orally and in writing. The course also explores the capacities and limitations of specific approaches and methods and gives attention to conducting research ethically.

Requirements filled: QI, English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3510
Teaching Young Adult Literature

TR 9:00 – 10:15

Dr. Steven Shively

 

This course is part of the professional training USU offers for future secondary school teachers. The state of Utah mandates a course in Adolescent Literature for grades 6-12 teacher licensure with an English endorsement, and ENGL 3510 meets this requirement. We will read several YAL books, but we will study them through a teaching lens. Among the topics we’ll consider are definitions of young adult literature, the place of YAL in the curriculum, dealing with difficult issues, creating effective lessons, characteristics of adolescents, graphic books, assessment, and evaluation. Class texts include several award-winning YAL novels:

  • The Outsiders, the genre-defining bestseller about violent gang culture in the 1960s
  • Habibi, the story of a female Arab teenager whose father moves the family from their comfortable suburban home in St. Louis to Palestine, where she is attracted to a Jewish boy in an echo of Romeo and Juliet (the author, Naomi Shihab Nye, will visit USU in the spring)
  • Scythe, set in a dystopian future where an organization called the Scythes decides who must die as consequence of the elimination of natural causes of death
  • I Am Alfonso Jones, a graphic novel about a young African American male who is shot and killed by a police officer; he wakes up in the afterlife on a train where his guides are famous historic African Americans
  • Exit, Pursued by a Bear, the story of a high school cheerleader who is drugged and raped at cheerleading camp; the novel presents the pitfalls she faces and her successes as she deals with this crisis. The title comes from a famous stage direction in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale.
  • Probably two additional books students select.

Requirements will include active participation, reading quizzes, writing position papers about teaching YAL, creating units and lessons, and presenting lessons to the class.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required), English Teaching Composite (Required)

ENGL 3610
Multicultural American Literature

MWF 10:30 – 11:20

Dr. Keri Holt

This course explores the diverse literatures of the United States by examining the work of contemporary Native American, Asian American, Latina/o, and African American writers. The course will focus on a range of genres from the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including short stories, poetry, drama, hip hop, and graphic novels by writers such as Louise Erdrich, Julia Alvarez, Kristen Valdez Quade, Toni Morrison, Luís Alberto Urrea, Edwidge Danticat, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Viet Thanh Nguyen, among many others.

Requirements filled: Literature (Literary History; American), Creative Writing (Literary History), English Teaching (Literary History; American)

ENGL 3700
Regional Folklore

Online

 Dr. Lisa Gabbert This course examines the production of folklore in relationship to region, focusing specifically on regions within the US.  We first discuss the history of the term “region,” and from there move on to examine a variety of expressive forms and the role/s they play in the construction of regional identity, particularly for outsiders.  These include but are not limited to the following: clambaking in New England; Mormon landscapes in the interior West; and hybrid forms along the Arizona borderlands. 

ENGL 3700
Regional Folklore

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Dr. Jeannie Thomas  Study of folklore andfolklife as they relate to regional cultures. 

 

ENGL 3710
Topics in Folklore: Chinese Folklore

Online

 Dr. Sophia Geng  In this class, we will read the English translations of popular Chinese folklore, legends, and myths. These include the tale of Mulan, the story of the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl, the legend of He Shi Bi, the myth of Nu Wa and many more fascinating stories from China’s rich oral traditions and folk literature. We will look through the lens of gender and intercultural communication studies to analyze how these stories evolved throughout history and how they were told differently in mainstream and vernacular cultures. Additionally, we will examine a number of adaptations of these stories in film, TV series, opera and dance by Chinese and Chinese American authors, and compare the differences in terms of language, theme, moral and functionality. This course will also expose students to the vibrant folklore communities in China and talk about folklore’s contributions to the formation of cultural identities.

ENGL 3710
Topics in Folklore: Latino Gangs and Cartels

TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Eric Morales

Latino gangs are routinely demonized, affecting public policy and framing our national debates. Yet, they are also romanticized in popular culture with sayings like “that’s gangsta” often used as a compliment to reference the media’s image of a hyper-masculine and sexual man who uses violence to achieve his desires—be they material possessions, drugs, or women. But what constitutes an actual gang? What of female or homosexual gang members? What created gangs and why do they continue to exist?

This class will unpack the realities facing Latino gang members, from adolescent street gangs to international drug cartels. Rather than see gangs solely as sources of crime and violence, we will approach them as alternative social structures that counter the alienation and marginalization resultant from issues of economic and social disparities. In the process, we will provide a holistic understanding of street life, looking at markers of expressive traditions, (tattoos, clothing, lowrider cars, folk religion, hip hop music), as well as a history of systemic social inequities (school to prison pipeline, racial segregation, barriers to education and employment). Throughout the semester, we will problematize issues of social networks, immigration, masculinity & femininity, sexuality, stereotypes, gentrification, and ethnicity. Our discussions of the causes, functions, and rituals of gang culture will be informed with perspectives provided from Folklore, Anthropology, Latino Studies, and Critical Race Theory. While Latino gang culture is the focus, we will cover social concerns that affect numerous disenfranchised populations.

ENGL 4200
Linguistics Structures

Online course

Dr. Sonia Manuel-Dupont

This is a 3-credit course.  It covers the following areas: morphology, phonology, syntax, child language acquisition, dialects, second language acquisition, world languages, and endangered languages.  It takes you through the process of what it takes to be a linguist and what linguists do.  From sub-Sahara Africa to the Navajo Nation you learn how language makes a human being uniquely equipped to deal with the world around us.  Assessment involves traditional exams, essays, and projects.  This is also a service learning class where you will create a language enhancement experience for a primary school in Uganda.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4210
History of the English Language

MWF 8:30 – 9:20

 

Dr. John McLaughlin

This course will examine the history of the English language from the earliest linguistically determined levels (Proto-Indo-European) up to the present day. It will include not just the nuts and bolts of how the sounds, grammar, and lexicon of the language changed, but also the sociolinguistic context of the role that the language played and how it was used during the run of its recorded history. This will include the rise of English as a modern global language and its role in the origins of pidgins and creoles around the world.

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Linguistics)

ENGL 4300
Shakespeare

MWF 10:30 – 11:20

Dr. Phebe Jensen

The purpose of this course is to help students begin (or continue) a life-long process of enjoying Shakespeare’s works; explore the theatrical and cultural contexts that originally informed Shakespeare’s plays; and understand Shakespeare’s works as living texts that have been and continue to be reinterpreted. Students will gain a broader understanding of both Shakespeare’s work and modern reinterpretations as they gain factual knowledge about Shakespeare’s work, the genre of drama, and issues surrounding authorship.  In addition to six Shakespeare plays—A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, King Lear, and The Tempest—students will be required to see five films and read the Caribbean writer Aime Cesaire’s reinterpretation of The Tempest, A Tempest.

Requirements filled: Literature (Required), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching

ENGL 4310
American Writers:
Colson Whitehead’s Remaking of America

TR 12:00 – 1:15

 

Dr. Christopher González

 

Colson Whitehead’s literary imagination has challenged readers to rethink American history, folklore, race relations, and literary genres through often-unexpected narrative turns, challenging storytelling, and reorientation of comfort zones. The winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Carnegie Medal for Fiction, Whitehead has situated himself as a vital part of the 21st century American literary landscape. What do Whitehead’s writings reveal about our notions of American history? How do his forays into speculative genres cause readers to reconceive of what it means to be an American? In an effort to answer these and other questions, this course will dive deeply into Whitehead’s works of fiction, including The IntuitionistJohn Henry DaysZone OneThe Underground Railroad, and more.

Requirements filled: Literature (Authors; American), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

 

ENGL 4350
Studies in Poetry:
How Poetry Can Save the Planet

MWF 12:30 – 1:20

 

Dr. Paul Crumbley

This course explores the work of Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and Robert Frost as major American poets whose writing influenced the poetry of May Swenson. The course pays particular attention to each poet’s writing about the environment and examines emerging scholarly readings that approach these texts within the relatively new and growing field of ecocriticism. Dickinson and Whitman are widely recognized as the two most influential nineteenth-century American poets, both of whom are well known for their writing about the natural world. Frost is also known for his nature poetry, and he is one of the best known and most widely read of all twentieth-century American poets. Swenson admired all three and met Frost in 1957. Her own writing reflects their influence through poems that examine the importance of place and register her sensitivity to the human impact on the natural world. Dickinson and Whitman pair up well with Frost and Swenson in the sense that Dickinson and Frost are both closely associated with New England, while Whitman and Swenson are more closely linked to New York. Even though Swenson grew up in Logan, Utah, and retained a strong attachment to the West, she spent her writing life in and around New York City.

Requirements filled: Literature (Genres), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

ENGL 4400
Professional Editing

TR 9:00 – 10:15

Zarah Moeggenberg  As a technical communicator, you will need editing skills in the workplace. You will need to know how language works and how to make it work for you, as well as how to make it work for others. In this course we emphasize editing skills, and especially editing processes for professional and technical materials and the tools that allow you to do them. Some of the processes included in this course are copymarking, copyediting, proofreading, and editing for inclusivity. You will also learn to comprehensively edit technical documents for content, organization, graphics, and design. This course has 4 major assignments, one of which is community-based and the other is a collaboration with the Center for Innovative Design and Instruction.  

Requirements filled: English Core (Writing), Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 4420
Advanced Fiction Writing

TR 12:00 – 1:15

 

Dr. Charles Waugh

 

 

The purpose of this advanced fiction writing course is to allow you to make the step from story dabbler to serious fiction writer, and to help you, as M.S. Bell says, “deploy unconsciously, intuitively, instinctively” the rudimentary skills you learned in the introductory course.  The readings of our own work will be the basis for our workshop discussions, which means you must read the work in advance and come to class prepared with notes to help you give thoughtful, constructive criticism. We will also read exemplary texts to help us better understand what creates good writing, to train ourselves always to read as a writer, and to find how a particular word or sentence contributes to the overall effect. As a writer, you should cultivate a similar approach to life, the goal being to become what Henry James called, “one of the people on whom nothing is lost.” The success of the workshop will depend entirely on your own inventiveness, your complete engagement and full participation, and your abilities to recognize the narratological nuts and bolts of a story, to not be swept along by plot, to be critical but supportive, and to remember that the text is being critiqued, not the author.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4430
Advanced Poetry Writing

F 12:30 – 3:20

 

Dr. Michael Sowder

 

English 4430 is an advanced poetry-writing workshop. Accordingly, much of the work of the semester will involve reading and responding to each other’s work in a rigorous yet supportive environment. Writing workshops were for me the most exciting and rewarding courses I took in college and grad school, and I hope this one will be as rewarding for you.

As you probably know, world literature began with poetry—deriving from religious ritual, magical spells, chants, and incantations. Other forms of creative writing—novels, fiction, and creative nonfiction—derived from poetry. Poetry employs the tools of creative writing in the most intense, compressed, and sophisticated ways possible. If you study the poetry of the last several millennia, you’ll sharpen and hone your writing in whatever genre you ultimately choose to write in. 

In addition to our weekly workshops, we’ll also read several contemporary books of poetry, beginning with a famous twentieth-century collection, Ariel, by Sylvia Plath, and a collection by her equally famous—and infamous—husband, Ted Hughes’s, Birthday Letters.  We’ll also read The Best American Poetry of 2017, a fantastic collection of contemporary poems. Ross Gay’s exuberant A Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude will lighten our mood after Plath and Hughes.  In addition, we’ll read a book by our own professor Ben Gunsberg and a collection of mine, House Under the Moon.  These works will help us deepen our understanding of the diversity of styles and themes of contemporary poetry and help us see how it achieves its power. 

Grades will be based on a portfolio of poems turned in at the end of the semester and class participation.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing)

ENGL 4440
Advanced Nonfiction Writing

MW 2:00 – 3:20

 

Dr. Jennifer Sinor

The advanced workshop in creative nonfiction builds on the craft skills acquired in the intro course, but it deepens the study of the genre by focusing on specific forms. This semester we are considering the long form, a subgenre of creative nonfiction that is rooted in new journalism. Students will write two essays that are heavily steeped in research. The first essay will rely on the first person with the research working as a metaphor. The second essay will rely on the research for the story/tension with the first person providing example rather than narrative drive.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Advanced Creative Writing) 

ENGL 4500
Teaching Writing

TR 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4500 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program.  This course will combine the content knowledge you have gained in your English coursework with pedagogical theory, enabling you to cultivate theoretically robust teaching practices.  The learning activities and projects in this course will help members of the class collectively examine three related concepts:  designing, engaging, and assessing writing experiences.  Broadly, we will study the following questions:  What are meaningful aims for writers?  How do secondary writing teachers prompt students to engage in these purposes?  What kinds of support do students need to achieve these learning goals? Our course texts (Write Like This:  Teaching Real-World Writing Through Modeling and Mentor Texts, Teaching Middle School Writers:  What Every English Teacher Needs to Know, and Using the Workshop Approach in the High School English Classroom:  Modeling Effective Writing, Reading, and Thinking Strategies for Student Success) and additional scholarship will support our investigation into these questions. 

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520/SCED 4300
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms / Clinical Experience II English

TR 10:30 – 11:45

 

Dr. Jessica Rivera-Mueller

English 4520 is one of the required courses designed specifically for students in the English Education degree program. Students are required to also register for SCED 4300 (002), the clinical experience that accompanies this course. Paired together, these courses provide an opportunity to peer deeply into classroom moments and learn about teaching and learning from a range of educational stakeholders, including secondary students, peers, mentor teachers, and scholars. Beyond reading about or practicing teaching tasks, these courses aim to help you help you develop a robust understanding of literacy from the perspective of a teacher in diverse classroom settings.  Collectively, we use our course reading (Fires in the Bathroom:  Advice for Teachers from High School Students, Differentiated Instructional Strategies:  One Size Doesn’t Fit All, Educating for Empathy:  Literacy Learning and Civic Engagement, and additional scholarship) and experiences in the clinical to examine classroom teachers’ roles as literacy educators. To that end, you will actively study scholarship related to teaching and learning, observe learners and learning communities, provide instructional support, deliver instruction, and reflect upon your process of becoming a teacher.  Engaging in each of these processes provides an opportunity to grapple with the connection between educational theory and practice.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4520/SCED 4300
Teaching Literacy in Diverse Classrooms / Clinical Experience II English

W 5:15 – 7:45
(Note: This is a blended broadcast course that meets via interactive videoconferencing every other week.)

Dr. Amy Piotrowski

 

Public schools are serving an increasing number of students who come from diverse backgrounds. Such diversity suggests that one-size-fits-all curriculum and instruction will not serve the varied literacy learning needs of students populating public schools. This course, designed for students in the English Teaching emphasis, will focus on meeting the needs of diverse learners from different ethnic, linguistic, social, and SES backgrounds in addition to learners with disabilities.  You will learn to differentiate lessons for the students in today's secondary English classrooms.

Requirements filled: English Teaching (Required)

ENGL 4540
Teaching Creative Writing

T 5:15 – 7:45

Dr. Jason Olsen

 

Students in this course will learn methods for successfully teaching creative writing at multiple levels, from K-12 to college. The strategies taught will include development and management of a classroom creative writing workshop (with an emphasis on teaching the language of creative criticism) and how best to teach literature in a creative writing environment (and teaching students how to read as writers rather than academics). 

Among the methods to be employed over this hybrid course will be the assignment of three books from the 2018 Best American series (poetry, short fiction, and essays) to give material for the enrolled students to learn how best to teach contemporary literature in a creative writing environment. Besides those three volumes, the main text for the semester will be one the students will create: as we work through the different facets of workshops and literature, I will assign students to write on specific creative writing themes (that will be discussed throughout the semester) and after peer workshop and editing, these writing projects will evolve into chapters and the multiple chapters the students contribute will compose a student-created text.

ENGL 4700
Folk Art and Material Culture

T R 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Lisa Gabbert We will be looking at folkloristic approaches to the study of folk art and material culture, including an emphasis on individual artists, the role of creativity in tradition, artistic processes, tools, and materials, and the importance of cultural context. Some time will be spent deconstructing the categories of “art” and “folk art.” Topics range from pottery, textiles, and mortuary art to yard art, tattoos, and home altars.  Books include William Warner Wood’s Made in Mexico: Zapotec Weavers and the Global Ethnic Art Market (Indiana University Press 2008), Jon Kay’s Folk Art and Aging: Life-Story Objects and their Makers (Indiana University Press 2016), and Jeannie Banks Thomas’ Naked Barbies, Warrior Joes, and other Visible Forms of Gender (University of Illinois Press 2003). The course is cross-listed as a graduate course; Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to write a substantial research paper.

ENGL 5310
Contemporary Literature: Postcolonial Science Fiction

TR 10:30 – 11:45

 

Dr. Shane Graham

Postcolonial literature (which, for purposes of this course, refers to writing from Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia) shares a surprisingly large number of themes with science fiction. Both frequently explore issues of colonization, domination, encounters with the Other, and cultural hybridity. Both investigate the disorienting effects of new technologies. Both depict the tensions between center and periphery, and between mimicry and appropriation. And both often try to envision future societies, either as dystopian cautionary tales or as ideals to strive toward.

For these reasons, it should be no surprise that a great deal of science fiction (or, if you prefer the more encompassing term, “speculative fiction”) has emerged from formerly colonized parts of the world in recent decades. This course takes Dawn, published in 1987 by African American novelist Octavia Butler, as a pioneer of what is often called Afrofuturism. It continues with Amitav Ghosh’s novel Calcutta Chromosome (1995). We will then read two novels, one novella, and a large number of short stories published in the last decade, along with a number of academic articles and book chapters that theorize and contextualize the literature. The book list includes: from Nigeria, Nnedi Okorafor’s Binti and Deji Bryce Olokotun’s After the Flare; from South Africa, Mashigo Mohale’s Intruders; and from the Caribbean, Karen Lord’s The Best of All Possible Worlds and Nalo Hopkinson’s Falling in Love with Hominids.

Requirements filled: Literature (Lit & Culture), Creative Writing (4000+ Lit), English Teaching (4000+ Lit)

ENGL 5410

Studies in Writing for Digital Media Production

TR 12:00 – 1:15

Zarah Moeggenberg Technical communicators  frequently produce procedural and instructional documentation. In this course, you will get a range of experience with this essential type of technical communication: producing instructions in video, print, and other media formats. You will learn how to develop inclusive and accessible documentation, developing technical documents for diverse audiences in our local and USU communities. You will showcase your competencies through multiple smaller assignments (digital and print-based) and one semester-long assignment (print-based).
 
Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 5420

Project Management in Technical Communication

MWF 9:30 – 10:20

Dr. Avery Edenfield

 

The main focus of this course is learning how to successfully manage complex projects in diverse teams. The technical communication field increasingly requires professionals to be able to demonstrate skills in collaboration, interpersonal communication, multi-tasking, and team writing. In this course, students gain experience in these areas by working on a semester-long project. This course is intended to give students hands-on practice working as a team on a long project with multiple (graded) components. Much of the work for this project is self-directed. Each team is in charge of their own self-designed project (under the guidelines provided). 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL 5430

Professional Writing Capstone

W 1:30 – 4:00

Dr. Ryan Moeller

This course is designed to prepare you to successfully negotiate the job market after graduating with a degree in English studies. While the course was designed as a required capstone experience for students in the Professional and Technical Writing emphasis of the major, all students can benefit from a sustained and critical look at their professional identity materials. You will learn how to professionalize and present your experiences as a student/worker/intern to potential employers and to develop successful job materials, such as a portfolio website, resume, cover letter, social media presence, interviewing strategies, and more! 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Required)

ENGL 5450

Special Topics in Creative Writing: Novels, Novellas, and Long Stories

TR 9:00 – 10:15

 

Dr. Charles Waugh

 

The purpose of this special topics course is to explore the structures and creative demands of long forms of fiction: novels, novellas, and long stories. Students will read several theories of the novel alongside six exemplary long forms of fiction, map how they are structured, make maps of their own long work, and write 40-60 pages of their own fiction that will be workshopped at the end of the semester.

Requirements filled: Creative Writing (Required for Students Starting Program Fall 2018) 
ENGL 5490

Marketing and Proposals

MWF 10:30 – 11:30

Dr. John E. McLaughlin

This course will look in detail at how to understand the underlying motivations of consumers based on archetypes and deep metaphors. You will learn how to conduct consumer research through advanced interviewing techniques. You will also look at the role of communication, social media, and on-line networks in marketing and how to build them.  A final component of the class will be using these tools and insights to construct marketing documents including a proposal (either commercial or non-profit). 

Requirements filled: Prof/Tech Writing (Major Course Option)

ENGL/HIST/ANTHR 5700

Folk Narrative

Online

Dr. Lynne McNeill  This course introduces students to two of the major genres of folk narrative: folktales and legends. Commonly distinguished from each other by their complex relationships to questions of truth, these narrative forms of folklore have been at the base of folkloristic study since the inception of the field. Spanning familiar stories such as Cinderella to modern manifestations likecreepypasta, students will focus not only on the stories themselves, but will learn the major scholarly and analytical approaches that folklorists have taken to the study of narrative throughout the history of the discipline. There is a range of options for a final project--from a traditional research essay to conducting fieldwork to writing a creative project--and while this is an online class, there will be plenty of interaction and opportunities to share and appreciate eachother's work.